April - June 18

Waikato Times 30/6/18 (Also in Weekend Sun/Sunlive 29/6/18) 
BRICKBAT FOR SQUASH PLAYER
Dame Susan Devoy's appointment by Race Relations Commissioner, Judith Collins in 2013 to the role of Human Rights Commissioner seems to have been made on the basis of public popularity and international sporting success.

World Squash championship can scarcely be a guarantee of experience and competency in human rights issues.

Her appointment initially was criticised by Maori who lampooned her in verse and she was told by Marama Davidson, on a web page, "Susan, stand down".

However once in office she soon linked in with Maori aspirations and was quite often markedly and injudiciously outspoken in support of them when objectivity was required.

Of late she has been even more impartial, acerbically demeaning older white men, "stale, pale and male." Over her tenure instead of bringing harmony to race relations, she has proved culturally and racially divisive.
BRYAN JOHNSON, Omokoroa

Nelson Mail 30/6/18 
CATCH UP, CUZ
Joel Maxwell (Nelson Mail, June 25), newly keen on Maoriness, sees racists everywhere British.

His criticism of the Oxford New Zealand Dictionary rests on feelings, eagerness to feel slighted, and dubious memory. I'd rather back scholarship and my longer memory.

Oxford bases definitions on numerous examples, not feelings. And I remember well the growth of "bro", at first used solely by young Maori, not Pakeha. Bro paralleled other words among Maori, equivalents tote reo terms for generational groups such as cuz, aunty, nanny. We Pakeha kids used "uncle" that way. ("We called him uncle, but he's not my real uncle".)

Maxwell should be delighted that another Maori usage has become so widespread, and has almost lost the gang connotations it certainly had 35 years ago. He should rejoice that an English publication accepts the validity of non-UK English and keeps fairly up to date. It's linguistic scholarship, Joel mate. Try it some time.

Maxwell, belatedly, is starting to see how languages reflect cultures. That's good.

Many Kiwis are well ahead of him. He might stop shouting until he knows more. It's called growing up.
CHRIS BLACKMAN Richmond, June 26

Otago Daily Times 28/6/18 
TREATY PARTNERSHIPS
WHILE alleging lack of honesty about Treaty of Waitangi partnership by Hobson’s Pledge, Civis fails on two points.

First, no number of definitions of the word ‘‘partnership’’ is going to change the fact there is no reference to ‘‘partnership’’ in the Treaty.

Second, assertions by Civis that Article 3 does not give equality of rights and that Article 2 gives extra rights to Maori remain as assertions, not fact.

A writer hiding behind a pen name, as Civis does, while hurling accusations, shows a lack of spine.

The partnership gravy train has continued so long because voters and taxpayers have been carefully kept out of having any say.

The recent decisive votes against Maori wards shows where the public stands on the Treaty industry.

If there is any rat to swallow, the outrage shown in the Civis piece may imply that he or she may be doing the swallowing.
MIKE BUTLER Hobson’s Pledge national councillor, Hastings

NZ Herald 28/6/18 
TE REO ON TRAINS HAS ITS PITFALLS
New Zealand is reckoned to be a country of low productivity. To further this reputation the local train service now repeats all in-car announcements in Maori.

Most of the time it is of no consequence if regular users ignore all announcements but, just in case there has been some development, most turn their attention from what they are doing and listen.

Now the whole tedious interruption takes twice as long. Extra attention is necessary to determine if it is the all-Maori announcement or not.

If a separate refined accent were used for the English, travellers could immediately and efficiently recognise what will be useful to them and ignore that provided for hobbyists.

Apparently well paid brains are currently being exercised to dream up Maori station names to substitute for the simple, easy to remember, time worn English ones.

This has all the makings of disaster. Sooner or later there will be an emergency; some obsessed soul will quote the contrived Maori name and lead emergency services astray.
BOB CULVER, Avondale.

New Zealand Herald 28/6/18 (Short & Sweet section) 
ON RENAMING
Given the current practice of bestowing Maori names on all and sundry, it seems odd the All Blacks have yet to be spared this favour, especially as they are such an obvious legacy of our colonial past.
KERRY CRAIG, Mt Eden.

Northland Age 28/6/18 
STOP PRETENDING
I read recently of more part-Maori rushing off breathlessly to a conference of indigenous peoples, and coming back with ideas of improving part-Maori by promoting “language strategies and programmes based on traditional and modern Maori learning and teaching methodologies”.

We have to ask ourselves, what makes a part-Maori indigenous? For some reason, I’m beginning to suspect that it’s not his Caucasian ancestry. That’s because the European settlers are believed to have arrived in New Zealand after the Maori settlers.

Well then, are these part-Maori indigenous because of their Maori ancestry? It's believed that Maori arrived in New Zealand approximately 500 years before Captain Cook. Well that disqualifies them immediately, because the definition of an indigenous people is "naturally existing in a place or country rather than arriving from another place" (Cambridge English dictionary) such as Taiwan.

And anyway, how can someone who is a mix of races claim to be of one race rather than the other?

No, no, no. The time is well past for part-Maori to stop pretending to be what they are not, and to stop pretending that Maori language and/or culture is going to serve them well in the world. Teaching that to children is another form of child abuse.

Part-Maori parents will serve their children best by enrolling them in state schools where they will mix with all sorts of children, including part-Maori, and where they will be educated by trained teachers, including part-Maori, and where they will learn the English language and literature, the mathematics, the chemistry, the physics and the philosophy that have produced physicians, statesmen, engineers, nurses, law-makers, priests, nuns et al, part-Maori amongst them.

The separatism/racism that drives biculturalism and multiculturalism is a cancer in our civilisation. The Treaty of Waitangi acknowledged the rule of the British Queen over all residents of New Zealand in return for the protection of that Queen as British citizens.

We are all British citizens, with the freedoms and the untold benefits that accrue from that.

Let part-Maori practise Maori customs and speak/teach Maori language in their homes and marae, as do Indians, Filipinos, Chinese, French, Dutch, Irish. Outside our homes, let's enjoy the government system, the education system, the bureaucracy, the judicial system that has proved to be unbettered in the history of the world.
LEO LEITCH Benneydale

Dominion Post 28/6/18 
PAN MAORI CONSENSUS DIFFICULT
Kelvin Davis, the minister of Crown-Maori relations, probably realises his ministry's greatest challenge (June 23) is that of trying to appease the wishes of the disparate iwi who signed the Treaty of Waitangi, which, at least in the expectation of Captain Hobson, was supposed to unite all New Zealanders as "one people".

Well, that hasn't happened, largely because nga iwi Maori themselves fmd it difficult to compromise and agree on pan-Maori objectives. In the meantime, the Waitangi Tribunal has exacerbated the situation by negotiating independently with nga iwi, seemingly negating the role of the New Zealand Maori Council (which, if it still exists, has kept a very low profile for many years now) and diminishing the prospect of kotahitanga (one people).

Perhaps Crown-Maori relations on issues other than land settlements could be streamlined by asking nga iwi Maori to present unified, agreed and prioritised objectives to the ministry through a national organisation, like the Maori Council, so a more focused and productive approach to over-coming the over-representation of Maori "in just about every negative social statistic" can be achieved more effectively.
RAY RICHARDS, Trentham

Otago Daily Times 27/6/18 
USE SOME ‘TRUE FACTS’
IT would have been appropriate for ‘‘Civis’’ to get properly informed of some true facts of history before stating Hobson’s Pledge were ‘‘not honest in their claims’’ (ODT, 23.6.18).

‘‘Civis’’ chooses to quote the socalled translation of the Treaty of Waitangi by the late Hugh Kawharu, which is grossly perverted in too many ways to explain here.

It would be fairer and more accurate to quote Hobson’s final draft of February 4, which the late Ngapuhi elder Graham Rankin asserted in 2000 meant exactly the same as the signed Maori text.

Thus: ‘‘The Queen of England confirms and guarantees to the chiefs and tribes and to all the people of New Zealand the possession of their lands, dwellings and all their property.’’

In quoting Mitzi Nairn’s bizarre claim that Hobson’s simple statement ‘‘We are one people now’’ ‘‘more likely meant’’ ‘‘We have reached an agreement’’, ‘‘Civis’’ drifts further into the realms of fantasy. It’s weird!
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Dominion Post 27/6/18 
STUFF AND NONSENSE
Joel Maxwell (June 25) refers to "that Stuff story about the 1997 edition of the Oxford New Zealand Dictionary," which has the entry for "bro" as: "Used by Maori young people or to or of Maori, especially among gang members, or among members of the extended family."

Maxwell claims that is racist because it links bro to Maori, Maori families, Maori gangs and, in an example, to Maori rape. The example is quoted as, "Hurry up bro. [Spoken to a Maori adolescent who is raping his own sister]".

Although neither Maxwell nor Stuff says so, the scholarly Oxford New Zealand Dictionary: Words and Their Origins (1997) offers three examples to support the identified origin; and, for the example referred to by Maxwell, says it is from Tahuri, a collection of short stories by Ngahuia to Awekotuku.

So the association of bro and Maori, particularly Maori rape, was made by a Maori who is unlikely to be racist towards Maori as claimed by Maxwell. Maxwell has chosen incomplete, misleading material that fits his biased conception, resulting in a rambling article that is largely stuff and nonsense. It is part of an attempt to rewrite history.
BARRIE DAVIS, Island Bay


WETERE'S PAST
No mention in the tributes to Koro Wetere that in 1987 David Lange and his staff; plus Geoffrey Palmer, tried to get Wetere sacked as Maori Affairs minister and to resign from Parliament over the Maori loan affair; Wetere was a supporter of Roger Douglas.
JOHN WILSON, Johnsonville

Nelson Mail 27/6/18 
TREATY OF WAITANGI
Gary Clover (Letters, June 20) seems to not know that the "Maori treaty" he refers to was initially drafted in English and then translated into Maori. In neither draft is any inference made to a "governing partnership".

Within society, people may share common views and interests. These groupings are basically tribal in nature - however, in a democracy they do not give the members, collectively, any special rights under the law or to local government representation.

The treaty, Maori or English, has no legal standing as a treaty in international law. Maori were not an organised state, and to be recognised, treaties can only be made between legitimate states.

Mr Clover also seems to be unaware that rural wards do not represent farmers or rural people only. To make up the numbers, they can sometimes include suburbs of towns etc, and are inclusive of all races.
HELEN MOSELEY Richmond,

Northland Age 26/6/18 
NO SUCH WORD
One expects better from MP Kelvin Davis, an ex-school teacher, but here he is again twisting New Zealand’s history and making up stuff (Dominion Post, June 23).

Firstly, could Mr Davis please point out where the word ‘partnership’ is in the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi (English or Maori versions)? It simply isn’t there. Such a concept has only recently arisen, as separatists have busily reinterpreted the Treaty to better fit with their political ideology.

Secondly, Hone Heke’s 1845 rebellion against Crown governance had nothing to do with the so-called land wars, which were about 15 years later.

Heke’s ‘frustration’ was with the Governor relocating New Zealand’s capital from Kororareka to Auckland, so ships were no longer stopping off in the Bay of Islands. This resulted in Heke suffering a dramatic drop in his lucrative customs, berthing and other revenues.

Perhaps even more infuriating was the mana of hosting the Governor had now gone to Ngapuhi’s traditional enemies, Ngati Whatua.

Davis’ hope to see a partnership between Maori and government agencies reeks of apartheid and the corruption that goes hand-in-hand with it. He is certainly hell-bent on furthering a ‘them and us’ society. He would do better by working to raise parenting abilities and educational standards, things that will help all needy Maori achieve more in the 21st Century.
GEOFF PARKER, Kamo


A SPECIAL DAY
I support Kevan George Marks’ letter in The Northern Advocate June 20 about keeping Queen’s Birthday holiday and getting rid of Waitangi Day, which is nothing but a farce. I believe May 3, would be more suitable to celebrate as our ‘Independence Day’, when New Zealand became a British colony under one flag and one law, irrespective of race, colour or creed.

Extensive research by the One New Zealand Foundation Inc. has found Queen Victoria’s Royal Charters/Letters Patent of 1839 and 1840 were the documents that made New Zealand into a British colony under one flag and one law.

The Treaty of Waitangi told tangata Maori, “If they gave up their territories and governments to the Queen they would be given the same rights as the people of England”. New Zealand had already been made part of NSW by the Charter of 1839, under the ‘Law of Nations,’ with the proclamations read by Lt. Governor Hobson at Waitangi on January 30, 1840, seven days before the first signature appeared on the Treaty of Waitangi.

Instructions for the Treaty of Waitangi given to Captain William Hobson by Lord Normanby were drafted by James Stephens, the Undersecretary for Colonies and a very strong supporter and member of the Clapham Sect. The Clapham Sect was a group of aristocratic evangelical Anglicans prominent in England from about 1790 to 1845, who campaigned to abolish slavery, to protect indigenous peoples from colonial exploitation and to promote missionary work at home and abroad.

From these instructions, presentation and wording of the Treaty of Waitangi, it seems highly unlikely the British Parliament knew of the Treaty before it was first signed on February 6, 1840. No mention was made of the Treaty of Waitangi in Queen Victoria’s royal charters/letters patent of 1839 and 1840.

The Law of Nations recognised no other mode of assuming dominion/ sovereignty in a country of which the inhabitants were ignorant of the meaning of sovereignty, and therefore incapable of ceding sovereignty rights. This was the case with those inhabiting New Zealand, for whom it would have to be impossible for Captain Cook or Lt. Governor Hobson to have obtained sovereignty by cession.

Tangata Maori consisted of hundreds of small individual tribes without any form of united government, continually at war with each, and the reason why Hobson had to deal with each tribe/chief as individuals when signing the Treaty of Waitangi.
IAN BROUGHAM, Wanganui

Dominion Post 26/6/18 
EVIDENCE AND FEELINGS
Joel Maxwell writes, "As long as [scholarly research] is undertaken by humans, it should be judged the result of feelings, as much as pure reason" (June 25).

Joel likes feelings, especially his own ones. He feels especially good about learning te reo Maori.

Bob Brockie, on the other hand, seems less into feelings. In Bob's piece, right next to Joel's, Bob writes about archaeologists recently unearthing the site of a Germanic intertribal battle 2000 years ago. He tells us that, "[t]he archaeologists interpret the scene as confirming the ferocity and cruelty of the German tribes".

For any modern German who does not like the idea of her forebears being ferocious and cruel, Joel has the answer - simply judge the archaeological evidence to be the result of the archaeologists' nasty feelings about ancient Germanic tribes.

Likewise, any Maori who don't like the scholarly research that ancient Maori were just like all other humans - killing each other in droves and laying waste to their natural environment -can tell themselves the research is just feelings and Maori really lived in perfect harmony with each other and their environment.
JOHN MCLEAN, Khandallah

Nelson Mail 25/6/18 
MAORI WARDS
How outrageous and what an insult to our elected Tasman mayor and councillors for Gary Clover (Letters, June 20) to say that Maori values and priorities are denied during council decision making because there is no Maori ward in place on the council. And contrary to what he says about the Treaty, it is constitutionally impossible for the Government, and logically also for local government, to enter into a partnership with those it governs. Anyone, including iwi-representing Maori candidates, can gain a place on local bodies by putting themselves forward for election.
TREVOR GATELY, Richmond,


IWI REPRESENTATION
Neville Male’s haystack obviously has a little more light than Gary Clover’s (Letters, June 20), which appears darkened by his fanciful interpretation of history and his support of elite iwi supremacy. Comparing rural wards with race-based wards is a nonsense.

Maori already have a place at the decision-making table, the same vote as the rest of us, along with the considerable added advantage of the requirements under the Mana Whakahomo a Rohe amendments to the Resource Management Act, which require councils to consult and involve Maori in any planning around local resources.
KEN MILLWARD, Upper Moutere,

Otago Daily Times 25/6/18 
LEARN FROM THE PAST
IT is a long shot to claim that "biodiversity lessons can be drawn from early Maori (ODT, 19.6.18).

As your article records, there was wholesale transformation of New Zealand right from the outset of human colonisation. In the first century of settlement, nearly halfthe forest had been destroyed, either by deliberate or unintentional fires (McGlone, et al).

Despite apparent awareness of what was being lost, extinctions continued. The prevailing culture of resource exploitation rolled on.

As one species was decimated, focus shifted to what was left —just like everywhere else.

"By learning as much as possible about the past," the article contends, "we could create a blueprint for saving the species we had left".

Regression to a romanticised but failed past will serve political agendas. but little else.
BRUCE MASON Ranfurly 

Rotorua Daily Post 23/6/18 
COMMERCIAL BOTTLERS OF WATER
The current debate over water right allocations for use by commercial bottlers of water for export is strange (Coffey called out over water bottling, June 16).

What reason can anyone have to object to this?

According to Wikipedia the current worldwide sales of bottled water exceeds 100 billion litres per year.

This global demand could be met by, for example, the Manapouri tailrace flow in two or three days.

What? Yes, what is the problem?

Is it influenced by the desire by some Maori to use the court to gain control of New Zealand’s fresh water — with more than an eye on irrigation and the water flow through hydroelectric power stations?
PETER DARE Rotorua

Nelson Mail 23/6/18 
MULTILINGUAL NZ
Joel Maxwell's claim that New Zealanders are monolingual (Letters, June 11) is wrong and racist, because it devalues the many other languages used.

It was the same in Germany, when people gushed about my 3-year-old's command of English and German but disparaged kids who spoke Turkish.

Korean is the second language in Takapuna.

Kids in my son's classes have talked Chinese, Korean, Hindi, German, Swiss-German, Japanese and many other languages.

Another son talks Norwegian and Italian.

Friends talk Finnish, Estonian, Danish.

My schoolmates 60 years ago talked Polish, Samoan, Serbo-Croat.

Do Niuean, Fijian, Tongan, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Cambodian not count?

There are many out there at ease in three or four languages.

Friends speak Russian, German and English, Afrikaans and Dutch, Indonesian and Malay.

In the flag debate, commentators had no idea of the insult their clinging to a Royal Navy ensign with a few stars is to those whose forebears suffered under British rule-Irish speakers, for example.

Similarly insulting is the view that Kiwis speak only English (and a few te reo.) Nothing else counts.

Maxwell's ignorance belittles very many of his fellows.
CHRIS BLACKMAN, Richmond

Northern Advocate 23/6/18 
QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY
I support Kevan George Marks' letter in Northern Advocate, June 20, about keeping Queen's Birthday holiday and getting rid of Waitangi Day which is nothing but a farce but I believe May 3 would be more suitable to celebrate as our "Independence Day" when New Zealand became a British Colony under one flag and one law, irrespective of race, colour or creed.

Extensive research by the One New Zealand Foundation Inc has found Queen Victoria's Royal Charters/Letters Patent of 1839 and 1840 were the document that made New Zealand into a British Colony under one flag and one law.

The Treaty of Waitangi asked tangata Maori, "If they gave up their territories and governments to the Queen they would be given the same rights as the people of England".

New Zealand had already been made part of NSW by the Charter of 1839 under the "Law of Nations" with the Proclamations read by Lt Governor Hobson at Waitangi on January 30, 1840, seven days before the first signature appeared on the Treaty of Waitangi.

Instructions for the Treaty of Waitangi given to Captain William Hobson by Lord Normanby were drafted by James Stephens, the Undersecretary for Colonies and a very strong supporter and member of the Clapham Sect. The Clapham Sect was a group of aristocratic evangelical Anglicans prominent in England from about 1790 to 1845 who campaigned to abolish slavery, to protect indigenous peoples from colonial exploitation and to promote missionary work at home and abroad.

From these instructions, presentation and wording of the Treaty of Waitangi, it seem highly unlikely the British Parliament knew of the Treaty before it was first signed on February 6, 1840. No mention was made of the Treaty of Waitangi in Queen Victoria's Royal Charters/ Letters Patent of 1839 and 1840.

The "Law of Nations" recognised no other mode of assuming dominion/ sovereignty in a country of which the inhabitants were ignorant of the meaning of sovereignty, and therefore incapable of ceding sovereignty rights.

This was the case with those inhabiting New Zealand, for whom it would have to be impossible for Captain Cook or Lt Governor Hobson to have obtained sovereignty by cession.

Tangata Maori consisted of hundreds of small individual tribes without any form of united government continually at war with each other for territories and the reason why Hobson had to deal with each tribe/chief as individuals when signing the Treaty of Waitangi.
IAN BROUGHAM Wanganui

Dominion Post 22/6/18 
A STEP TOO FAR
By Joel Maxwell's definition, being a "decent Pakeha" means a person of European descent who accepts Justin Lester's drive for the Te Tauihu policy without question.

Obviously I'm not a decent Pakeha, as I can't help feeling my culture, and that of the majority of New Zealanders, is going to be trampled into the dust in the headlong rush by councils to be politically correct.

My grandparents were migrants in the early 1900s; should that make their culture subservient to one that arrived 550 years before?

We are all descendants of migrants, after all. What's wrong with Civic Square? What does Te Ngakau mean? It can't be a Maori name for Civic Square as that place didn't exist in pre-European times, or has someone just dreamed it up?

Name new streets as the council wills it, but whom are we pleasing by changing names willy-nilly? It's a step too far.
GRAHAM DICK, Masterton

Northern Advocate 20/6/18 
KEEP QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY
In the Typical Talks article in the Advocate of June13, Vaughan Gunson writes under the heading: "Ditch Queen's Birthday for a real stellar celebration".

I say leave Queen's Birthday alone. If we are to remove a holiday, let it be Waitangi Day, which is nothing but a farce.

If I were to agree with Gunson, I would say that we should have a four-day holiday closest to November 16, the day that Queen Victoria gave New Zealand its Royal Charter/Letters Patent in 1840.

That could be on the nearest Friday, and the following Monday could be International Day, which could celebrate the nationality of every person who has picked New Zealand to be their home country.

Why celebrate Matariki (Pleiades, the seven sisters) in the middle of winter? The four-day break would be well into spring when temperatures would be warmer.

I extend my challenge to Gunson. Why have the people who dwelled in the country before the coming of the Maori not been paid out like the Maori have?

What caused the depletion of these people, and who were responsible for their almost complete annihilation? New Zealand's future will be bleak until these questions are answered.
KEVAN GEORGE MARKS Kaipara

Northland Age 19/6/18 
MANY ‘SMALL’ VOICES
Well, what a lengthy rant from Wally Hicks (Democracy is broken, letters June 14).

Mr Hicks accuses the Northland Age of being biased and yielding space to Dr Muriel Newman, when week after week for at least the last two years readers have been subjected to Anahera HerbertGraves’ anti-colonist propaganda, and contributions from other pro-Maori or Marxist contributors.

The Northland Age is one of the few newspapers that publish views from all quarters of a debate, and full marks to the editor in doing so.

Kiwi Frontline has compiled the results of 32 public polls in relation to Maori issues, which clearly show that his ‘small voices’ of the population are in fact around 75 per cent of New Zealanders that support democracy, racial equality and one law for all.

Yes, British muskets were used in the musket wars.

The tribes traded gifts, land, etc, to obtain these weapons, then they loaded, aimed and pulled the trigger on fellow Maori — it was not the Brits that caused the mayhem and destruction.

Does Mr Hicks think that the Brits should have supplied more guns and ammunition instead of drafting a treaty and consulting with chiefs, because in this way the tribes would have annihilated themselves and the Brits could have walked into a vacant land?

Most fair-minded New Zealanders do not live in constant fear hatred of Maori renaissance. They unashamedly advocate for democracy and oppose all forms of racism in New Zealand and the fake history of our country on which so much of it is based.

Democracy is based on the simple principle that all citizens must be treated the same under the law.

Every individual has the same rights, and indeed has the same responsibilities under the law. In this way citizens that affiliate to minority groups have the same voice as the next person. The summation of the majority is not a tyranny of the majority as Hicks harps on about, but is actually wisdom of the masses.

That some constituents chose not to vote in the Maori ward referendums does not detract from the end result of an overwhelming majority voting ‘No’ to installing separatist Maori wards in the five councils involved.

In closing, I challenge Mr Hicks to produce evidence of Dr Muriel Newman or Hobson’s Pledge ever having used the term ‘daughter slaughter’.
GEOFF PARKER, Whangarei


SOMETHING’S WRONG
Wally Hicks has returned with a vengeance. Wally claims, as usual, that New Zealand’s democratic history is a record of tyranny of European over Maori. Oh, what a grand, sweeping piece of rhetoric.

Your other letter-writer, Richard Gravenor, has backed away from specifying any instances of part-Maori underprivilegement; Wally now needs to do so.

Meanwhile, we can agree with young Wally that our form of democracy is not perfect. For example, when an 18-year-old unemployed gang member, father of two children from different mothers who survive on the DPB, has the same voting power as a 40-year-old married, employed father of six children from the same woman who is his wife, then something is wrong.

And when a man serving a prison sentence for rape has the same voting power as the aforementioned 40-year-old, there is something wrong.
LEO LEITCH, Hamilton


TELL A LIE
Joseph Goebbels said: “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.”

Substitute “news and current affairs media” for “State”.

Such strategy has been used for a few decades now in regard to falsification of the Treaty of Waitangi, and today’s letter from Wally Hicks perpetuates it.

Mr Hicks repeats the claim that the Treaty created a partnership between Maori and British. But there is no mention nor any hint of partnership in the very brief Treaty of Waitangi.

The Treaty comprises only a preamble and three paragraphs. In the first paragraph, the Maori chiefs cede absolutely to the Queen all rights and powers of sovereignty. In the second paragraph, the Queen guarantees to the chiefs and their tribes full possession of their properties, but the chiefs cede to the Queen the right to be first in line to purchase any lands that Maori might be disposed to sell at agreed prices. In the third paragraph, the Queen extends to the Maori her protection and all the rights and privileges of British subjects.

The Treaty was an excellent document, designed to facilitate peaceful, safe, cooperative life among Europeans and Maori. And it pretty much did that until approximately the 1970s, when media personalities came from overseas, where badly-treated native and indigenous people had been raising resentful protest, and promulgated that totally inappropriate resentment here with a view to advancing their personal careers. Think Brian Edwards, for example.

And resentment has built upon resentment, proving to be a very lucrative pursuit for the elite, until now there is huge non-Maori resentment toward those of mixed race who call themselves Maori.
Well done.
ALAN JONES, Invercargill


A GIGANTIC FRAUD

Dear Mr Little, 
You are quoted in Waatea News (June 11, 2018) as saying with respect to current negotiations with Ngapuhi: “a major feature of the negotiations will be the tribunal finding that Ngapuhi rangatira did not cede their sovereignty by signing the Treaty of Waitangi.”

Now here are the exact words on February 5, 1840, of all the chiefs who opposed signing the Treaty, recorded by Colenso and verified by Busby at the time (albeit not published until 1890):

Te Kemara, chief of Ngatikawa: “Health to thee O Governor . . . I shall never say ‘Yes’ to your staying. Were all to be on equality, then, perhaps, Te Kemara would say 'Yes; ' but for the Governor to be up and Te Kemara down ... low, small, a worm, a crawler -no, no, no."

Rewa, chief of Ngaitawake: "I will not say 'Yes' to the Governor's remaining. No, no, no; return. What! This land to become like Port Jackson."

Moka, chief of Patuheka: " Let the Governor return to his own country: let us remain as we were."

Kawiti, chief of Ngatihine: "I will not say 'Yes' to thy sitting here. What! To be fired at in our boats and canoes by night! What! To be fired at when quietly paddling our canoes by night! I, even I, Kawiti, must not paddle this way, nor paddle that way, because the Governor said `No'."

Hakiro, who appeared to speak on behalf of Titore, deceased chief of Ngatinanenane, arose and said: "0 Governor! I say no, no, no.. . . We will not have a Governor!"

Tareha, chief of Ngatirehia: "Thou, the Governor up high up, up, as this tall paddle". Here he held up a common canoe paddle and continued: "and I down, under; beneath! No, no, no. I will never say 'Yes, stay"'.

Wai, of Ngaitawake, who claimed that trading conditions were unfair, also opposed signing.

It is crystal clear that these chiefs of Ngapuhi sub-tribes understood that by signing they would become subordinate to the governor and hence to the Queen; that they would cede sovereignty.

All except Wai, who disappeared, signed within a few days.

An equal number of chiefs spoke in favour of signing and did so.

There are plenty of people today who claim that they did not cede sovereignty because kawanatanga' means merely `governorship', and not 'sovereignty,' and that tino rangatiratanga', guaranteed to all the people of New Zealand, does mean `sovereignty'. This is false, because translation is not the same as derivation —and I could give you plenty of examples of this if you want them.

Furthermore, Hobson's final draft in English of February 4, and the treaty text in the Ngapuhi dialect, were both read out on February 5.

Considerable numbers of people, both Maori and English, understood both languages, and nobody said that they said different things, which was verified by the late Ngapuhi elder Graham Rankin (in 2000), who said when shown both texts that their meanings were identical.

In short, the Waitangi Tribunal assertion that the Ngapuhi chiefs did not cede sovereignty is blatantly untrue, and furthermore, the Tribunal is surely culpably ignorant if it is not aware of the solid facts of history above.

You refer to Ngai Tahu having been "somewhat helpful". You should be aware that the Ngai Tahu settlement of 1998, their fifth "full and final settlement," was a swindle perpetrated upon the people of New Zealand. I recommend that you refer further to the works of Everton and Hampton to which references are given if you seek further elucidation.

While some measure of compensation may be due to Ngapuhi for historical wrongs, given the present basis of negotiations, as reported, it appears to me that they will lead to an even more gigantic fraud perpetrated upon the people of New Zealand than that of Ngai Tahu.

The reported situation is extremely serious, and I request on behalf of us all that you initiate a major overhaul of the current procedures before they proceed any further, and that the true facts of our history outlined above are recognised before any Tribunal recommendations are accepted
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Dominion Post 16/6/18 
MASTHEAD IN MAORI
I hope the publishers of The Dominion Post do not intend to persist with the masthead in Maori.

This nonsense is fine for city councils with too much ratepayer money to spend or for posing politicians, but definitely not in our daily newspaper.

The Maori language is on life support to the tune of $300 million to $400m a year for purely political reasons. A total waste of money but that is politics.

It is important that the Maori language not be lost so encouragement should be given to evening classes for those interested. They could use their skill at ceremonial events to showcase the language.

Trying to put Maori into general use is a foolish dream. Would The Dominion Post expect reporters to file their copy in 19th-century English?

Everyone in New Zealand, apart from a few new immigrants, can speak English so have no use for Maori. If our children are to have the advantage of a second language let it be a language of use in the wider world, perhaps, Mandarin, Cantonese, Japanese, French, German, Italian, Dutch. There are so many options for young people to choose from.

To counsel our idealistic honest youngsters into learning Maori is a form of child abuse when they have so much to learn in practical subjects.
REG FOWLES, Walkanae

Otago Daily Times 14/6/18 
HONOUR THE TREATY
IT seems that twisting of the Treaty of Waitangi and associated events knows no limits and Dame Joan Metge’s delusion, quoted by Alan Somerville (ODT, 9.6.18), is just another example.

Hobson clearly meant ‘‘We are now one people’’ and its translation ‘‘He iwi tahi tatou’’ meant exactly that.

It is high time those clamouring for special privileges for anybody with a trace of Maori ancestry honoured it.
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Waikato Times 14/6/18 
MARAE SCEPTIC
I watched TV1's Marae programme where the odds were stacked again, this time four separatists against one person defending democracy and legal equality. One wonders what the producers are afraid of? Could it be the truth?

There were all sorts of lies touted by the separatists. John Minto stated that Maori have only received a fraction ($1.3 billion) of what they should have received in settlements. This figure is completely wrong. Kiwi frontline has compiled information from the Office of Treaty Settlements' website and the total figure as at Dec 2016 was $3.07b. And since then, the Government has continued to make payouts, substantially increasing that total.

In addition, nothing was mentioned about the race-based (Maori-only) yearly funding of at least $1.16b, which comes on top of other distributions through health, housing, social development, and education.

Tuariki Delamere added his bit of misinformation too, implying that Equiticorp investors had been bailed out by the taxpayer after the 1987 sharemarket crash. In fact, the receivers took a court case against the Crown over the sale of NZ Steel. The Crown lost the case and the resulting payment was by order of the judge.

Finally, Minto quoted Chris Finlayson's supposed words of wisdom: 'Read the treaty'. Well, I wish he and Finlayson both would as it says nothing about preferential treatment for Maori.
GEOFF PARKER, Kamo

Bay of Plenty Times 14/6/18 
AN ISSUE OF PRONUNCIATION
While watching the TV3 news on June 9 I heard Tariana Turia talking about her love for the Whanganui river; I noticed she pronounced it as Wanganui with the h being silent.

As I am from Taranaki, not Turanuki as some would say, I was always taught the people of the West Coast North Island do not and never have pronounced WH as F. If this is so, why do the so-called expert to reo teachers tell us differently.
NEIL HARVEY Welcome Bay

Northland Age 14/6/18 
A CASH COW
The Treaty of Waitangi states categorically that all New Zealanders are equal under the Crown, and this being the case, why are some New Zealanders discriminated against by Government and others not?

In New Zealand today, immigrants are treated differently than all other citizens, despite having lived and worked most of their lives in this country. This discrimination I am referring to is relating to the theft of overseas retirement savings by the Government.

The principles of the Treaty of Waitangi seem not to apply to immigrants, because those principles, if adhered to in the spirit of the Treaty, would prevent this discrimination taking place.

Why does this section of New Zealand society lose their self-funded savings while ordinary Kiwis who save in a similar scheme (KiwiSaver) do not lose theirs?

To put it simply, immigrant pensioners are a proverbial cash cow for the New Zealand government, one they are unwilling to relinquish because it brings them in over half a billion dollars a year to help subsidise New Zealand super.

Where is the level playing field when the New Zealand Government can steal from one segment of New Zealander immigrants and give handouts to another — Maori? Where is the equality when one race receives billions of dollars in so-called compensation, and another has their hard-earned savings stolen?

These are not the principles of the Treaty. Far from it, they are a recent adaptation of them that now is dividing us as a nation.

This Government and its predecessors have conveniently forgotten the spirit under which the Treaty was signed and by whom. It was signed between the people of New Zealand and the Crown, with no mention of Maori. Why then does Government discriminate against some immigrants and not others? We were all immigrants, Maori included.

By discriminating against non-Maori immigrants, the Government is openly in breach of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, signed to give all New Zealanders equal rights. The Government cannot change the principles of the Treaty, and are bound to uphold them, so why are they not doing so?

The answer to this is simple — greed —and this is being allowed to continue unabated. The principles of the Treaty by law must be administered equally to all New Zealanders —not just the chosen few.
PAUL REA Hawera

Nelson Mail 13/6/18 
MAORI WARDS
We have recently learnt that Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) has made a recommendation to central Government to amend the Local Government Act to allow Maori wards to be established in all local bodies without ratepayers being given the opportunity to vote in a referendum in support or otherwise. Where is LGNZ’s mandate coming from for this?

Five local bodies which previously carried out referendums with their ratepayers resulted in an overwhelming vote against Maori wards being established. The action taken by LGNZ to remove what is a key democratic right of ratepayers is a disgrace, and I would hope our mayors, Reese and Kempthorne, would both be strong dissenting voices on the matter at the next meeting of LGNZ.
NEVILLE MALE, Stoke,

Dominion Post 13/6/18 
WE SHOULD ALL JUST BE CITIZENS OF NEW ZEALAND
A RESEARCHER recently offered a $5000 reward to anyone who could find the word "partnership" in the Treaty.

He knew his money was safe because neither the word nor the partnership exist.

As pointed out by Hobson's Pledge, "Maori and the Crown are not partners in any sense of the word.

It is constitutionally impossible for the Crown to enter into partnership with any of its subjects".

At that time, the British Empire was at its peak and had no reason to do such deals.

The partnership fallacy has been perpetuated by uninformed people who do not know their own history, and by those who stand to profit from it.

In article one, Maori ceded sovereignty absolutely and without reservation. Article three guarantees equality for all New Zealand citizens.

I would urge all thinking New Zealanders to honour Hobson's Pledge of "We are now one people", before greedy, self-seeking separatists divide our nation for their own ends.

Concerned citizens should email Kelvin Davis. the Minister of Crown/ Maori Relations, asking him to act honorably and in good faith for the benefit of all New Zealanders, as citizens with the same rights.

It is essential there is only one class of citizenship in this country.
MARK MUNRO Port Chalmers

Waikato Times 13/6/8 
COASTAL LAND CLAIMS
The law change between Ngati Porou and the Crown for around 200km of the East Coast coastline north of Gisborne, is phony and racial discrimination.

This highlights the cost to taxpayers of bogus coastal claims.

The whole coastal marine area was once vested in the Crown under common law, on behalf of all New Zealanders. Everyone had free access and the rules associated with the use of the area for defence, commerce, conservation, and recreation were governed by Acts of Parliament.

Then in 2002, as a result of an escalating dispute between Nelson tribal groups, the Court of Appeal overturned settled law to find that customary title might exist.

A tsunami of opportunistic claims followed which led to a Labour government act which re-affirmed Crown ownership but enabled Maori tribes to claim territorial customary rights.

To appease their Maori Party coalition partner National repealed the act and replaced it with the Marine and Coastal Area Act, to encourage Maori group claims. More than 600 coastline claims were lodged before the six year deadline - most within the last few days.

This racial discrimination stinks. Keep NZ free and open for all of us.
DENIS W. SHUKER, Cambridge

Dominion Post 13/6/18 
THE NAME DOESN'T ALWAYS FIT
Sometimes moving to Maori names can be even more offensive to the local iwi. For instance, the proposal to change the name of Levin to Taitoko displays ignorance about the town's history.

According to a Royal Commission of Inquiry, Major Kemp fraudulently sold the land and then pocketed the proceeds. His father had fled the Horowhenua when Ngati Toa threatened to exterminate Mua-Upoko.

As an historian knows, Major Kemp, or Taitoko as he was also known, spent his childhood and adult years in Whanganui, where he is buried.

So why would the descendants of Taueki and others who remained to defend their ancestral lands tolerate this final insult?

Levin was never known as Taitoko, and why should it be?
ANNE HUNT, Foxton Beach

Northland Age 12/6/18 
STACKED AGAIN
I watched TV1’s Marae programme (June 10), where the odds were stacked again, this time four separatists against one person defending democracy and legal equality. One wonders what the producers are afraid of. Could it be the truth?

All sorts of lies were touted by the separatists. John Minto stated that Maori have only received a fraction ($1.3 billion) of what they should have received in settlements. This figure is completely wrong. Kiwi Frontline has compiled information from the Office of Treaty Settlements' website, and the total figure as at December 2016 was $3.07 billion. And since then the government has continued to make pay-outs, substantially increasing that total. 

In addition, nothing was mentioned about the race-based (Maori-only) yearly funding of at least $1.16 billion, which comes on top of other distributions through health, housing, social development and education.

Tuariki Delamere added his bit of misinformation too, implying that Equiticorp investors had been bailed out by the taxpayer after the 1987 sharemarket crash. In fact the receivers took a court case against the Crown over the sale of NZ Steel. The Crown lost the case, and the resulting payment was by order of the judge.

Finally, Minto quoted Chris Finlayson's supposed words of wisdom: `Read the Treaty'. Well, I wish he and Finlayson both would, as it says nothing about preferential treatment for Maori.
GEOFF PARKER Kamo


DAY OF CELEBRATION
Some people are wanting to celebrate Puanga Matariki, Orion, Pleiades star constellation, as a public holiday, stating that maori navigated by these stars. Maori never navigated here. The early ones were brought out here by the Chinese.

How could they know anything about navigation? To navigate you had to have some place to navigate to.

If you need to make a day to celebrate, why not something closer to home, like Queen Victoria's Royal Charter November 16, 1840, which is our true founding document and first constitution. This important document has been ignored for over 173 years.

The day we should all celebrate a holiday as our Independence Day, May 3, when New Zealand became a British colony with its own governor and its own government under one flag and one law, instead of some star system a million light years away.
IAN BROUGHAM Wanganui

NZ Herald 12/6/18 
NO COMFORT 
Paula Tesoriero’s column in yesterday’s Herald on the Human Rights Commission’s recommendations to the Government should not comfort anyone concerned about free speech. The acting commissioner tries to link words with action, stating free speech must be balanced with the rights of individuals to be physically safe. The failure to make a distinction between words and actions is intellectually dishonest and a go-to justification for those who seek to muzzle freedom of expression. 

Legislation already protects the right to physical safety. Words are not actions. The commission seeks new legislation to sanction “hateful and disharmonious speech targeted at the religion and beliefs of ethnic minority communities”. Who will define these terms and why would they seemingly only apply to speech directed at minority communities? 
GYWNN RYAN, Grey Lynn. 


FREE SPEECH 
Paula Tesoriero, acting chair of the Human Rights Commission, seeks to reassure us there is no intention of limiting free speech in New Zealand as long as we are “respectful, dignified and informed”. Can she tell us just how respectful we have to be to a political and religious organisation that preaches from its holy book that non-members, apostates and homosexuals should be killed? 
STEWART HAWKINS, St Heliers. 

Northern Advocate 9/6/18 
DISCRIMINATION
The Treaty of Waitangi states categorically that all New Zealanders are equal under the Crown and this being the case why are some New Zealanders discriminated against by Government and others not?

In New Zealand today, immigrants are treated differently than all other citizens despite having lived and worked most of their lives in this country. This discrimination I am referring to is relating to the theft of overseas retirement savings by Government.

The principles of the Treaty of Waitangi seem not to apply to immigrants because those principles if adhered to in the spirit of the Treaty would prevent this discrimination taking place. Why does this section of New Zealand society lose their self-funded savings while ordinary Kiwi who save in a similar scheme (Kiwi Saver) do not lose theirs?

To put it simply, immigrant pensioners are a proverbial cash cow for the New Zealand Government, one they are unwilling to relinquish because it brings them in over half a billion dollars a year to help subsidise NZ Super.

Where is the level playing field when the New Zealand Govern-ment can steal from one segment of New Zealander immigrants and give handouts to another —Maori?

Where is the equality when one race receives billions of dollars in so-called compensation and another has their hard-earned savings stolen?

These are not the principles of the Treaty, far from it, they are a recent adaptation of them that now is dividing us as a nation.

This Government and its predecessors have conveniently forgotten the spirit under which the Treaty was signed and by whom. It was signed between the people of New Zealand and the Crown with no mention of Maori.

Why then does Government discriminate against some immigrants and not others? We were all immigrants, Maori included.

By discriminating against no Maori immigrants Government is openly in breach of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi signed to give all New Zealanders equal rights.

Government cannot change the principles of the Treaty and are bound to uphold them so why are they not doing so?

The answer to this is simple, greed and this is being allowed to continue unabated. The principles of the Treaty by law must be administered equally to all New Zealanders — not just the chosen few.
PAUL REA Hawera

Dominion Post 9/6/18
ROOM FOR ALL CULTURES
With regards to Christopher Watson's June 7 letter about sharia law as it relates to women-only times at public swimming facilities, how is the restriction on women speaking on many marae, or being required to sit in the back rows on those marae, any different?

Both pools and marae are public places hosting public events, which currently have rules that can result in the subjugation of women.

Is this a part of the New Zealand culture that Watson would have our Muslim citizens, residents and visitors be assimilated in to?

Is this a double standard on his part? It would appear so.

I believe that there is room for many cultures in New Zealand, complete with their customs.

And while I don't agree with the subjugation of anyone, I do believe in respect for the cultural norms of any group or religious organisations.

Finding ways to accommodate alternative beliefs (think non-western or non-Christian) should be an important part of public services. So go Porirua! You're on the right track until those customs and beliefs change. Hopefully sometime soon.
RANDALL COBB, Masterton

Weekend Sun / Sunlive 8/6/18 
DO THE HONOURABLE THING
As the lead petitioner in the recent Western Bay of Plenty District Council petition against the council’s decision to have separate Maori wards I would also like to add my voice to the growing number who are calling for the Mayor and councillors who voted for separatism in our council to do the honourable thing.

By the actions prior to and after the referendum that you have taken you have shown a complete and utter disregard for the ratepayers of the Western Bay of Plenty and I call upon you all to be prepared to stand by what you believe in and fall on your swords like men.

My father and thousands of others like him risked their lives fighting for democracy and one man, one vote and it will be interesting to see if any of the current councillors are prepared to show the same courage and intestinal fortitude that these men did.
R MCNAIR, Te Puke.


LACK OF DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES
I am writing in support of letters from C Humphreys and R Paterson (The Weekend Sun, June 1).

Thank goodness we have people like this in our community with such wisdom and clarity of vision and the courage to express their thoughts so well.

The Western Bay council support of a minority view from someone in Local Government NZ begs a serious question: why?

Western Bay support of that minority, only two days before the majority view in the poll was known was, in my opinion, pathetic. It treated the people who voted them in with contempt and disrespect and showed a total lack of democratic principles. Let’s deal with them next election.

Separatism and apartheid, as trotted out by some, is repulsive to any fair-thinking Kiwi from all races, ethnic backgrounds or skin colour.

I sometimes question the freedom and balance of reporting in some parts of the press, with good reason.

I take my hat off to The Weekend Sun for their impartiality, and chance for people of various opinions to express their view. Congratulations! Letters to the editor are the first things I read and need to provide the opportunity for free expression. Keep up the good work!
N MAYO, Katikati.

Northland Age 7/6/18 
TRUE HISTORY
I have read an article by Chester Borrows (Discarding what doesn't fit,' June 1), and am amazed at how little he knows of New Zealand's `true' history.

Taranaki lost their land to the Waikato in 1835. The Governor paid off the Waikato and gained ownership over the Taranaki lands. Parihaka was built on government land.

Te Whiti and his supporters were squatting illegally on Crown land that didn't belong to them. Those not killed or taken as slaves, who fled Taranaki, later commandeered the Rodney and travelled to the Chatham Islands, slaughtering the Moriori or farming them like swine into virtual extinction. You don't hear about that.

According to a reply from the Office of Treaty of Settlements, the Crown Office was unable to provide dates on which these alleged rapes occurred that Chester said happened, specific locations or the number of such offences. That the first report of the allegations was in 1927, 46 years later, to the Grievance Commission, seems to be speculation. Had atrocities taken place the press would certainly have capitalised on it.

What he fails to mention is when the village was entered by troops in 1881 they found stockpiles of weapons, including breechloaders, Enfield rifles, revolvers and ammunition.

Some of the women that were taken from Parihaka were part-Maori/Celtic. They were taken down to Dunedin to caves to breed with them, to get them far away. Because the caves were isolated and liveable, some Maori males, who were of high standing, were also taken.

In Dunedin, where the Parihaka men were, they were put to work on building, roads etc. However penal labour for road building was common for sentencing for prisoners regardless of race.
IAN BROUGHAM Wanganui


FREE SPEECH
One does not have to review the national print media for long to realise that most seem to operate agendas lacking objectivity, not open to free speech.

Opinions that may vary from those of their editorial staff journalists and contracted opinion writers are virtually never printed.

Whether it is on political, cultural, national or domestic issues usually only their aspect is presented.

This opinion will doubtless lack confirmation as it will never 'see the light of day'
BRYAN JOHNSON Omokoroa

Gisborne Herald 6/6/18 
OPPOSE THIS NAME CHANGE
Come on Gisborne residents, we are facing a name change to our area. This present name of Poverty Bay represents historical facts which spread from here to the whole world.

The famous Captain Cook first landed in Poverty Bay some 250 years ago and then circumnavigated and mapped New Zealand. He so-named Poverty Bay because he was unable to get food and water, however there were no such shortages as local tribes flourished in this area.

I cannot believe that anyone of sound mind would think the name Poverty Bay related to the present. I implore Gisborne residents who object to the name change to make submissions to stop this change happening.
TOM WILSON

Waikato Times 6/6/18 
COMPULSORY TO REO
I am 73 and grew up in Hamilton at a time when there were almost no Maori in the town. I attended primary, intermediate and high school in Hamilton and there are virtually no brown faces in my school photos. Consequently, I grew up with almost zero Maori contact or knowledge, and from memory, our class social studies teaching was very superficial.

Once I started work in the mid-1960s, things changed as I was posted to places like Mt Maunganui and Taneatua. The industry I was in, and allied to, had many Maori workers. We mixed and mingled freely on the job and over a beer. I regret not having learnt more about our own history, pre- and post-European. I have always thought there was a place for some language tuition as well. Some basic Maori would have helped to put some context around the culture and beliefs. Those classes would have been best in the two intermediate school years.

Today, I am not sure. Schools now have much more freedom as to what they teach and the methods used. What facts are taught today in Otorohanga may differ widely than those in Oamaru. I have almost zero confidence that pre-1900 New Zealand history could be taught with any consistency and Maori language would be unrecognisable to a fluent speaker of the language 50 years ago.

I have two Maori friends in their early 80s who have been fluent Maori speakers all of their lives yet now admit they can only converse within their own age group. They simply cannot understand the language as it is spoken today by younger people. Today the language contains so many "transliterations" of English words. They described it as sounding like pidgin to them. (abridged)
MURRAY REID, Tuakau

Rotorua Daily Post 6/6/15 
EDUCATION 'THE KEY'
I've experienced a fair few racist remarks in my time, mainly Pākehā to Māori (because most of my friends were Māori). I would stick up for them growing up in Taneatua, Galatea and Murupara, which would land me in a bit of strife at times.

You always stay loyal to your friends, that was back in the '80s and '90s. Times have changed now, things have gone full circle in the opposite direction and everybody just seems to have excepted it as being the done thing.

I know Māori have their grievances which are genuine and a fair bit of bloodshed spilt in the past but the country is trying to right the wrongs with fair compensation (Treaty of Waitangi).

Nobody can turn back the clock and change the past but never forget where you came from.

In my opinion Māori have to change their mindset from being the victim; I know it's easier to stay the victim, but as you all know hard work gets you everywhere in life.

Māori elders have done a fine job negotiating with the Crown, now it's the youth's turn to take full advantage of their hard work and remember education is the key to any door.
GAVIN MUIR, Rotorua

Gisborne Herald 5/6/18 
ATTACK TWISTED TO ‘CHALLENGE’
The landfall of Captain Cook in “Endeavour” off our coast on October 8, 1769 was a climactic moment for all concerned. Well aware of the fate of four of Tasman’s sailors, his party, in going ashore next morning to search for fresh water, was suitably prepared for similar developments. Events soon showed its wisdom.

With the boats left on the shore in charge of the Coxswain, four cabin boys remained in the yawl. Soon four armed men were seen running towards it. While yelling to the boys to move, he fired two warning shots which were ignored but, in Cook’s own words, “a third was fired and killed one of them upon the spot just as he was going to dart his spear at the boat”.

Like all of his kind, the Coxswain will have been a capable and experienced sailor who recognised the danger in which the boys were placed and acted appropriately. Yet in the locals’ oral history this event has been twisted into a ceremonial challenge in which the chief Te Maro was wantonly shot and killed. An attack on four boys in a boat hardly sounds like a “ceremonial challenge”.

As Wishart has observed, in Cook’s first week, “he and the Maori tested each other’s mettle”. That the locals with Stone Age weapons came off second best does not justify the negative opinions of Polly Thatcher (May 28, 2018 letter).
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Dominion Post 4/6/18 
A DOUBLE STANDARD?
I was recently so incensed by a Maori columnist describing my kind as "male, pale and stale" that I made a complaint to the race relations commissioner.

It was declined, but in a follow-up email to the commissioner I posed the question: Was it allowable for me to make disparaging remarks about the opinions of "old brown women"?

The reply was succinct: `The same laws would apply to your proposed 'disparaging remarks' as they did to your complaint regarding the use of the phrase `pale, stale and male'." Well, that clears that up.

But I'm confident that if I described some of the Labour Cabinet ministers with the inflammatory pejorative, "old brown women" it would never appear in print, and neither it should.

Is this evidence of a double standard in New Zealand? One rule for me but another rule for Maori commentators?
NEIL HARRAP, Wellington

Sunday Star Times 3/6/18 
PRIDE IN ANCESTRY
Like Vaughn Humberstone (Letters, May 27), I’m very proud of my ancestors.

In fact, I’ve just finished a long account of their three-month sail here in 1863.

He claims his forebears ‘‘worked very hard . . . for the benefit of all New Zealanders’’ when in reality they worked very hard for their survival and to make Aotearoa into a mirror image of their own homeland.

My ancestors, tenant farmers from Scotland, were told they could buy a farm here, but forgot to ask the provenance of the land they were being offered.

I am still mighty proud of them. But that doesn’t stop me from understanding the means by which they gained a foothold in this place and prospered.

I can’t rectify their misunderstandings, but I can know what they were, and who suffered because of them.

Perhaps Europeans did have no taste for cannibalism, but we certainly understood genocide. Think the hundreds of years of European tribal wars, or Auschwitz 75 years back.
MICHAEL KEIR-MORRISSEY, Carterton

Bay of Plenty Times 2/6/18 
LET'S MOVE ON
Can we move on from rehashing the ward referendum? The community has overwhelmingly spoken. They do not want councils divided by ethnicity, and they expect councils to honour the democratic principle.

I expect Maori to have input into council decision-making and I expect the council to consider those views but what I do not accept is for Maori to have an unqualified right of veto. To elevate the Maori world view above all other's world views is unacceptable. The Treaty cannot imply a superior form of citizenship. Any argument for different treatment under Article 2 or 3, based purely on an ethnic basis, is fundamentally repugnant.

We need to be country where we celebrate our differences, where our diversity enriches us, where ethnicity matters but does not bestow privilege where all citizens are united equality under the law. If we continue down the path of separatism and don't unite as New Zealanders, we will fail as a country.
RICHARD PRINCE Welcome Bay

Waikato Times 2/6/18 
COMPULSORY TE REO
There is an increasing number of voices being raised to advocate the compulsory teaching of te reo in schools. I would have thought that this makes as much sense as encouraging the Japanese to learn Ainu as a second language.

Undoubtedly, Maori culture plus the spectacular scenery are the main reasons why tourists flock here, but I can foresee a fierce backlash from parents who would rather their children concentrate on subjects like IT and the three Rs.

Having said that, Maori is a taonga and we should be doing everything in our power to ensure the language does not become obsolete.

But surely it is up to anyone with Maori ancestry to keep the language alive and make it more readily available in schools for those who should be encouraged to learn it.

As an example, my great grandfather was Italian and I have been moved to learn and pay to acquire basic Italian at evening classes.

I'm told that the local primary school has children from 37 ethnicities. Forcing a Somali immigrant to learn Maori when he/she is struggling with English does not make an atom of sense.
FRANK BAILEY, Hamilton

Sunlive – Weekend Sun 1/6/18 
RATEPAYER PLEA: ‘PLEASE LISTEN’
A resounding success with 78.8 per cent saying ‘no’ to Maori Wards for the Western Bay of Plenty District Council. Democracy prevails.

Two days before the result was announced, however, most of council and the Mayor, bar three councillors, decided to agree to a remit sent through from Horowhenua Council bound for LGNZ, then government. Undemocratically signed to ban we people from being allowed to democratically vote as we just have done. They want Maori wards to be of right for our council.

What happened to the will of the people? They could have waited until the Monday to see the result, but guessing what the result would be, they deceitfully went ahead on their own agenda and signed.

WBOPDC already has something like 13 Maori representatives who are paid to come to council meetings regularly to have input into council decisions. How many more do they require?

Many of us who placed a submission to the LTP for WBOPDC have almost begged that they start listening to their ratepayers before making major decisions. This council has an astounding arrogance and just ignores their ratepayers, which is at their peril. Remember election time next year. How about considering resigning now? Put us all out of our misery and give the purse strings a break!
C HUMPHREYS, Katikati.


RESULT A VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE
The inane decision supported by most Western Bay councillors to install race-based Maori wards predictably alienated the Western Bay community. The petition for a poll on the council’s decision readily attained signatures needed.

Having regard to past local authority referendums on race-based issues, predictably around 80 per cent of the Kiwi public would vote against race-based Maori wards, and so it proved to be. Incidentally Manawatu, Palmerston North, Kaikoura and Whakatane councils also got their comeuppance – result 5-0 at a 75 per cent average.

Hallmarks were no consultation with the electorates, nor were citizens’ views canvassed – a clear breach of the Local Government Act 2002.

The overwhelming vote shows that those Western Bay councillors and Mayor who enthusiastically embraced this race-based aberration should immediately resign. The countermand vote is tantamount to a vote of no confidence by Western Bay electors in these dogmatists and should mean eight councillor and mayoral by-elections – bring them on.

Alarmingly, not one elected member ever alerted the public to their Maori ward aspirations during 2016 elections, plus recent public-excluded meetings with hidden separatist agendas reeked of underhand scheming and stealth.

Worse still these poor losers have just passed a council resolution pledging support for LGNZ race-based legislation to ban future referendums.
R PATERSON, Matapihi.

1/6/18
Dominion Post 1/6/18
PUBLIC CLEAR ON MAORI WARDS
Supporters of Maori sovereignty are campaigning for the establishment of Maori wards.

Through their fraudulent claim of Treaty partnership with the Crown, they are pushing for the tribal co-governance of local authorities.

They want to remove our petition rights from the Local Electoral Act to prevent locals from having the democratic right to call for a referendum to challenge the introduction of Maori wards.

The activists' strategy has been to persuade people in influential positions to support their call for a law change.

We don't want local government defined by race.

The recently released referendum results for the five councils that decided to introduce Maori wards against the wishes of their local electors showed, in every case, that the public are opposed to race-based leadership.

The transition from democracy to dictatorship is incremental.

Changes can be slipped through in such a way that the public is not really aware of what's going on until one day we wake up and realise our rights have been ambushed.

The media seem to have been convinced by this propaganda that petition rights for Maori seats are discriminatory. It seems no-one in the media is challenging that assertion.
DENIS SHUKER, Cambridge


MANGLED DISCOURSE

Mostly I welcome a wide range of views in my morning newspaper. But Joel Maxwell's Pakeha the thieving ...(May 28) finally crossed some sort of line.

I thought it would eventually stop being a rant and have a point, but I never found it.

All your other opinion writers, even a couple of the new younger ones, are in a different - higher - league.

If you are trying to generate a race-prejudice debate in your paper, that's fine, but please get some balance.

If Joel has an internal battle going on because he looks like a "whitey" and has probably "benefited" all his life from that fact, and has not been able to claim martyrdom for the colour of his skin, then why do the rest of us have to share this mangled discourse inside his head.

And, if you were hoping for a satirical piece, then you just have to get a much better writer to pull it off.

Finally, if his headline had read Maori - the thieving neighbours from hell, I imagine you would have been hearing from race relations officials -opinion piece or not.

Hate speech is hate speech however you try to disguise it. [abridged]
SUE SMITH, Waikanae Beach


DEMOCRACY ISN'T FAIR
Joel Maxwell has incurred the ire of your letter writers. I say good on him - it's a much safer society where people can speak their mind without being censored as racist, sexist or politically incorrect.

The mistake Joel makes is thinking that democracy should be fair.

It was never intended to be, it is intended to establish the majority rule without resorting to armed conflict.

Countries that have minority rule do so by force of arms or disenfranchising the majority.

Is that what he wants for New Zealand?
CHRIS BOWEN, Lower Hutt


Northern Advocate 1/6/18 
MAORI WARDS 
The final results are out in five local government referendums on whether constituents of Western Bay of Plenty, Whakatane, Palmerston North, Manawatu¯ and Kaikoura wished to introduce Maori wards. The results ranged from 56 per cent to 80 per cent against race-based wards, a clear message from New Zealanders that they do not want local government apartheid.

I sincerely hope our local politicians take heed of these results as there should only be one set of rules, regardless of anyone’s ancestry. The alternative would divide families, neighbours and communities and is not the New Zealand way.
GEOFF PARKER, Whangarei

Bay of Plenty Times 1/6/18 
CONSULTING OBLIGATIONS
Your reader Robin Bell (Letters, May 30), clearly misinterpreted my letter (May 26). Having spent 20 years in local government on the Tauranga County Council and latterly 12 years as an elected representative on the Western Bay District Council, I do understand the electoral rules of local government.

My obligation to consult with Māori was enshrined in the RMA however, I also very clearly understood my ethical and moral obligation to talk with the various communities.

The comments I made in my previous letter are factual and I made them without any bias in mind.

Contrary to your letter there is evidence of a Maori ward, in your own Bay of Plenty Regional Council.
MAUREEN J ANDERSON, Pyes Pa

Dominion Post 30/5/18 
VIEW A RECIPE FOR DISHARMONY
The appalling racist diatribe from columnist Joel Maxwell (May 28) does nothing but drive a racist wedge between different groups in our society.

We are all boat people — some arrived in the 1300s, some in the 1700s, and of course many are still arriving.

None of us "own" this country, no one ethnic group has any more rights that the other.

If someone of European origin was to write such disgusting racist comment about Maori or Pacific Islanders, all hell would break loose, but because we have come to accept inverse racism as an everyday utterance from these separatist extremists, we allow it to continue.

Just because the majority of New Zealanders do not want race-based wards in councils does not make us racist. What it says is that we believe that all groups, including Maori, are capable of electing quality councillors within the existing structure (as has happened in Hastings).

To suggest Maori are incapable of electing their own people is an insult to Maoridom. The rejection of Maori wards was not a vote "against the brown guy" as Maxwell suggests — it was a vote for all races to be treated equally.

The Dominion Post no doubt takes the position that all opinion is acceptable and therefore it is justifiable to publish such divisive comment, but, somewhere along the line, hate-speak from any quarter must be stopped. [abridged]
STUART PERRY, Hastings


According to Joel Maxwell, my decision to vote "no" on Maori wards makes me a paranoid racist. I can assure him the feeling is mutual. I voted "no" because I don't agree with racial segregation of any kind. How about you, Joel?
SAM GARDINER, Palmerston North


Is there anyone more pious and self-righteous than a born-again Maori. Here we have Joel Maxwell waffling on as fact about stuff, by his own admission, he knows very little about, but has a gut feeling.

Perhaps, for starters, he could research Victoria University files, where he will find sale agreements for about 90 per cent of the land sales from Maori to the Crown. Ignorance is no excuse for stupidity.
ALLAN HEAD, Otakl

Bay of Plenty Times 30/5/18 
MAJORITY AGAINST
It should be obvious to even the least mentally astute politician, public official or local councillor that, as indicated by the results of the recent regional polls on establishing Maori wards, the majority of the population is against racially based and biased legislation. It is also time for the media to become objective in its reportage of ethnic issues and see that all points of view are fairly presented.
BRYAN JOHNSON Omokoroa

The Press 30/5/18 
MAORI IN PRISON
Jim Rose (May 29) tells us the real reason behind the significant increase in our prison population. Leftists and other misguided persons portray the justice system as overly harsh and believe colonial oppression has led to the high incarceration rate for Maori.

Nothing could be further from the truth. As Rose points out, miscreants have to work quite hard to be imprisoned. Judges make all kinds of allowances and usually impose prison sentences as a last resort. Also, often the term of imprisonment imposed is incommensurate with the nature of the offending, particularly violent offending, police use “alternative resolutions” to avoid charging an offender, and we now have marae based justice.
BRUCE ANDERSON, St Albans

Sunlive – Weekend Sun 29/5/18 
VANQUISHING RACISM
Results from five referendums opposing Maori wards demonstrates up to 80 per cent of Kiwis are against them. Bleating from mayors and councillors who unilaterally chose to actively promote and endorse Maori wards for Western Bay, Whakatane, Palmerston North, Manawatu and Kaikoura is offensive and preposterous.

Referendum costs are not caused by those seeking honesty, accountability and transparency, but by councillors never consulting with, nor seeking submissions from citizens, while kowtowing to vested Maori interests.

All race-based hogwash should be consigned to the trash can – it has no place in New Zealand. But look at the Labour Party and Greens’ horrific Maori policy manifestos and the recent utterances from Ms Mahuta, the Minister for Local Government and Maori Development, countenancing legislation to foist elected/unelected part-Maori representation onto local authorities and making Maori compulsory in schools. It is very easy to see where this fanaticism is heading so New Zealand First MPs must oppose any race-based legislative interference.

The apathetic, silent and irrelevant majority of Kiwis (80 per cent) must get off their butts and speak out. Thomas Jefferson said “If any law is unjust a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obliged to do so.” Civil disobedience on race-based nonsense is long overdue.

Next step: get rid of the seven Maori seats in Parliament. (Abridged)
R PATERSON, Matapihi .


ALLEGIANCE TO DISTRICT, NOT WARD
Ngai Te Rangi’s representative is “disappointed but not surprised” at the result of the referenda to create Maori wards.

Everyone who pays rates should understand that the Resource Management Act directs local government to consult with Maori, and they have over Maori wards. What they have not done is to consult with the wider community.

The result in the five districts that ran referenda was a resounding ‘no’. This is a clear message to Local Government NZ, who, without consulting their wider constituency have written to parliament to delete the ability for citizens to hold referenda on the creation of Maori wards.

Western Bay councillors did not wait for the results of their referenda. They sent confirmation to Local Government NZ stating that WBOPDC supports the letter written by David Cull, LGNZ to Nanaia Mahuta at parliament.

Every elected local government person swears an ‘allegiance’ to the district at large. Not a ward, and not a specific culture.
M ANDERSON, Pyes Pa.


MAORI WARDS UNNECESSARY
The weekend polls on Maori wards have undoubtedly included Maori who realise a limited access to all candidates and have voted accordingly. Certainly so in Whakatane where the proportion of Maori citizens is said to be 43 per cent.

It is not democracy to force Maori on the National Maori Electoral Roll to vote in a Maori Ward. Every voter deserves the ability to vote in any candidate of choice who is going to represent them for the next four years in local body matters.

[sic] would argue that Maori wards are discriminatory by providing a political right not accorded to all voters/ratepayers and residents. Those who argue for Maori wards under the guise of racism actually restrict Maori involvement in local politics.

A Maori ward is, in effect, nominating a Maori to serve on council. It is not a vote and that representative will not be a voice for all constituents. There is already provision for compulsory representation on councils under the Local Government Act, the Resource Management Act and representatives of local iwi and Treaty groups.

No other ethnic group receives such preferential treatment and local body recognition – all this without now publicly-recognised unnecessary Maori wards.
R STEPHENS, Papamoa.

Gisborne Herald 29/5/18 
ALSO SICK OF IT
Mr Emerson, I agree with everything you wrote. I am also sick of all this cultural nonsense that is being foisted upon us from all angles and from all ethnicities.

Mr Handford and Mr Mulrooney, like yourself, are doing the community a service by speaking out. It’s a pity the general public doesn’t seem to see it or recognise it. Thank you.
BILL O’BRIEN

Northland Age 29/5/18 
RESIGN NOW
Local Government NZ, councillors and mayors who tried to push undemocratic separatist Maori representation in local government must now resign. All polls taken show the great majority of people do not want Maori wards.

These minions were voted in by a majority, and immediately turned on those people who voted them in and conspired against them. They came into local government under false pretences and must go, resign.

There is no place for Maori lapdogs in local or another form of government.

If you do not support the majority that gave you the job you should not have run in the first place. If you don’t walk now you will be out on your racist backsides next election.
REX ANDERSON
Lower Hutt


A CLEAR MESSAGE
The final results are out in five local government referendums on whether constituents of Western Bay of Plenty, Whakatane, Palmerston North, Manawatu and Kaikoura wished to introduce Maori wards.

The results ranged between 56 per cent — 80 per cent against race-based wards, a clear message from New Zealanders that they do not want local government apartheid.

I sincerely hope our local politicians take heed of these results, as there should only be one set of rules, regardless of anyone’s ancestry. The alternative would divide families, neighbours and communities, and is not the New Zealand way.
GEOFF PARKER, Kamo

Waikato Times 29/5/18 (Also in Northland Age 29/5/18) 
MAORI WARDS
It should be obvious to even the least mentally astute politician, public official or local councillor that, as indicated by the results of the recent regional polls on establishing Maori wards, the majority of the population is against racially-based and biased legislation.

It is also time for the media to become objective in its reportage of ethnic issues and see that all points of view are fairly presented.
BRYAN JOHNSON, Omokoroa


COMPULSORY TE REO
I can understand where Rainga Wade, of Kihikihi (letters, May 26), and others trying to create a dominance of Maori culture are coming from . . . I really can. As the product of a Pakeha upbringing, yet also the father of three children who cherish the Maori side of our whanau as much as the other, I also cherish the Maori culture. I have the bones of my extended family resting in urupa on two East Coast marae, in the bosom of Ngati Porou, and also Central Hawke's Bay.

I have picked up a little conversational te reo, which in times of sadness and stress has allowed me to speak on marae appropriately. In having been a policeman in predominantly Maori towns, I have felt their pain, inherited not only from history, but from present-day circumstances. In spite of my affinity with Maori culture, the very sound of the word, "compulsory" gets my hackles up.

In a world where borders are increasingly challenged, I can understand the diverse cultures that make up our people wanting to dominate this land, yet as colonialists have learned, colonisation can never be enduring . . . nor can inverse colonisation endure, even when it comes from the heart of one people - tangata whenua. After all, in these strange and challenging times, we are all in the same waka. As such,we are never going to survive the rapids if we do not paddle in the same direction.
DENNIS PENNEFATHER, Te Awamutu


MAORI WARDS
I have to respond to T John Marshall's thoughts on racism (letters page, Saturday, May 26).

He says that people who oppose non-elected persons being given free seats on local bodies because of their ethnicity are racist.

I put it to you, Mr Marshall, that you, and anyone else who advocates the bending of the democratic process by placing non-elected persons on whatever board you choose because of their ethnicity are racist.

You seem to be following the same liberal left mantle of twisting things, and if repeated often enough, become true, or you would like to think so.

We are seeing much too often the erosion of the democratic process by the liberal left. In just our local community alone, the way the Hamilton City Council, Waikato District Council and the Waikato Regional council are totally ignoring the wishes of the people.

You state that someone has suggested you be deported. May I suggest, seeing as you would rather have non-elected persons in position of power, that you buy yourself a one-way ticket to North Korea. I'm sure the non-elected Supreme Leader will welcome you with open arms and you'll probably be much happier.
W PHELPS, Ohlnewai

Bay of Plenty Times 29/5/18 
BATTLE CONTINUES
Western Bay District Council’s vote to introduce Maori wards was rejected by voters with 78 per cent against.

This result was despite the council running what was, in my view, a huge pro-Maori wards campaign during the voting period, a campaign that was, in my opinion, unethical. Just two days before voting finished, the council endorsed a remit to have Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) lobby central government to prevent ratepayers petitioning for the sort of poll that the council knew it was about to lose.

Despite only two of its member councils having been able to introduce Maori Wards, LGNZ wants to remove our democratic right to have a referendum on Maori wards. Only three of our councillors voted against the remit.

Our mayor and councillors in Western Ward did not tell us they were going to vote for Maori wards before we elected them.

They did not consult with us before they voted for Maori wards. And just two days before the poll closed, when they must have known the majority of electors did not want Maori wards, they voted against our wishes. We may have temporarily won the battle, but the war to maintain democracy in New Zealand continues. (Abridged)
KEITH HAY Secretary, Western Ward Residents and Ratepayers Association

Dominion Post 29/5/18 
NAME CHANGE IGNORES HISTORY
Re: Levin name change suggested to go with makeover (May 26). This is just one maverick, grandstanding councillor acting without a mandate from the council, without the knowledge of the mayor, and definitely no mandate from the people of the town.

Victoria Kaye-Simmons seems to lack knowledge of our local history. Levin was established by the Wellington and Manawatu Railway Company that built a privately owned railway line when the government of the time would not invest in one.

A railway that helped open the Kapiti Coast, Horowhenua and Manawatfi to European settlement in the late 19th century.

As a reward for their contributions and their engineering achievements, the company named new settlements and stops along the route after company directors: William Hort Levin, John Plimmer, G V Shannon and James Linton.

Kaye-Simmons should stop interfering in our region's history and stop downplaying European achievements.

Our council needs to ensure that our local history, both European (railway, flax, timber milling market gardening, etc ) and Maori, is proudly portrayed together in all local displays, including in Te Takere and in the new development planned for the town centre.

In a similar way to how the wonderful Te Awahou Nieuwe Stroom centre in Foxton portrays Maori history and that of the Dutch settlers. (abridged)
ANNE CAMPBELL, Levin

NZ Herald 28/5/18 
WARD ARGUMENT ILLOGICAL
Your columnist Lizzie Marvelly abuses her privileged position in our largest newspaper to argue for the “fairness” of race-based Maōri wards.

Her comparison of Maōri wards with rural wards omits the obvious fact that rural wards are not race based.

Her argument fails anyway on its own logic. She argues against rural wards because they “have an outsized influence upon public decision making”, then turns around and argues for Maōri wards. You can’t have it both ways!
DAVID GIBBS Beach Haven


TIME FOR A FRESH FACE
It is heartening to see that Susan Devoy is finally leaving the position of Race Relations Commissioner.

Her time as the Commissioner has been fraught with controversy and ill will.

Time for a fresh face with better ideals to repair the damage sustained during the past five years.
J STAFFORD, Hastings.

Bay of Plenty Time 28/5/18 
TIME TO GO
The nine councillors and mayor of Western Bay District Council who continually ignore the wishes of their ratepayer people should do the decent thing and resign.
Not only do they ignore the resounding vote of no to Maori wards, but two days before the vote was announced, they agreed to a remit on removing the right of the people to vote on this issue.

This is being put forward to the Government by LGNZ to remove the ratepayers’ democratic rights.

We the people should demonstrate our rights to keep democracy.
C HUMPHREYS Katikati

Wanganui Chronicle 28/5/18 
NAMING PARK
I encourage everyone to make a submission on the name of Queens Park.

Queen Victoria is an important figure in the history of New Zealand. She not only brought British justice to this country and stopped the wholesale killing that was happening between iwi engaged in the musket wars, she also issued the letters patent creating this nation. As such she needs to be respected and does not deserve to have the feature named after her also called Sandfly Hill (Pukenamu).

The name Pukenamu may be an insult to some iwi as I believe it commemorates a pa used to dominate local iwi in ways that Maori radicals accuse the British military of.
TERRY O’CONNOR, Wanganui

Sunday Star Times 27/5/18 
PRIDE IN ANCESTRY
I was interested to read of research which found that there is now more pride in Maori ancestry than Pakeha ("Blue-eyed Maori politician feels 'like a fraud'," Focus, May 20).

I for one am proud to be a non-Maori white New Zealander (as opposed to being labelled a Pakeha). I am proud of my forefathers who arrived here by ship with little more than the shirts on their backs, and who worked hard to help build this county for the benefit of all New Zealanders today.

I am also proud of the fact that my forefathers did not engage in either cannibalism or genocide.
VAUGHN HUMBERSTONE, Pukehohe


Carmen Parahi ("Being Maori is Maori enough", Focus, May) says "I simply am Maori". Well that is fair enough but it is absolutely no reason at all for special Maori seats in Parliament or any local body.
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Bay of Plenty Times 26/5/18 
NO TO MAORI WARDS
The weekend polls on Maori wards have undoubtedly included Maori voters who realised they would have limited access to all candidate and have voted accordingly. Certainly so in Whakatane where the proportion of Maori citizens is said to be 43 percent.

It is not democracy to force Maori on the national Maori electoral roll to vote in a Maori ward locally. Every voter deserves the ability to vote in any candidate of choice who is going to represent them for the next four years in local body matters.

Others would argue that Maori wards are discriminatory by providing a political right not accorded to all voters/ratepayers and residents.

In my view former New Plymouth mayor Andrew Judd and your correspondent Peter Dey and others do not realise how their arguments for Maori wards actually restrict Maori participation in local politics.

A Maori ward effectively appoints Maori to serve on the council. It is not a vote and that representative will not be a voice for all constituents.

There is already provision for compulsory representation on councils under the Local Government Act, the Resource Management Act and representatives of local iwi and Treaty groups.

No other ethnic group receives such preferential treatment and local body recognition -- all this without a now publicly recognised unnecessary Maori ward. (Abridged)
R STEPHENS Papamoa


PATRONISING
Peter Dey (Letters, May 23) disagrees with my contention that the ability of large numbers of Maori to get elected to Parliament makes a nonsense of the argument that Maori wards are needed to enable Maori to be elected to local government.

He notes, rightly, that "parliamentary elections ... have a Maori roll and Maori electorates" and he deduces from that Maori wards are needed to ensure adequate Maori representation in local councils.

But he ignores the fact that of the 29 Maori now in Parliament only six needed Maori electorates to get there — the others got there by winning general electorates or being placed high up on party lists. The leader of the National Party is Maori, and he got to Parliament by winning Tauranga on his merits. The deputy leader of the National Party is Maori, and she got there by winning the electorate of Upper Harbour on her merits. It is likely that the Northcote byelection will be won by Dan Bidois, another Maori who will win on his merits.

We simply do not need racially divisive wards to see Maori elected to local government, and to suggest otherwise is patronising to Maori.
DON BRASH Auckland


NO SURPRISE
Ngai Te Rangi's representative is "disappointed but not surprised at the result of the referenda to create Maori wards.

Everyone who pays rates should understand that the RMA directs local government to consult with Maori and they have over Maori wards. What they have not done is to consult with the wider community.

The result in the five districts that ran referenda was a resounding "no". This is a clear message to Local Government New Zealand, who, without consulting their wider constituency have written to Parliament to delete the ability for citizens to hold referenda on the creation of Maori wards.

Western Bay councillors did not wait for the results of their referenda, they have sent a confirmation to Local Government New Zealand that WBOPDC supports the letter.

Every elected local government person swears an 'allegiance' to the district at large. Not a ward, and not a specific culture.
MAUREEN J ANDERSON Pyes Pa

Dominion Post 26/5/18 (To the point section) 
Glenn McConnell writes (May 24), "last week kaumatua led a 600-strong Tauranga Moana contingent to Parliament. It was an awe-inspiring display". Some would say it merely manifested dashing Maori property claims. More importantly, he made no mention of a RNZ radio allegation that kuia speaking in te reo incited some in the crowd to throw things at the attending minister, Andrew Little. It is good the radio reporter alleging this disgraceful behaviour understood te reo.
KEN MARTIN, Waterloo

Daily Post Rotorua 26/5/18 
CLEAR MESSAGE
The recent results of referendums carried out by five councils throughout the country resulting in the stopping, in effect, of the creation of Maori wards sends a very clear message to the promoting race-based representation.

Given the significant (more than 70 per cent against) majority, the tired old argument about Maori being under-represented on councils must he well and truly redundant.

Combine that with the rejection of the separatist Maori Party at the last election, plus the current trend of Maori switching from the Maori to the General roll, then clearly the mood of the country is changing.

Consequently the question must be asked as to how successful, or otherwise, has the role of the Maori representation on our local Rotorua Lakes Council been to date. As we know the Te Arawa Standing Committee was promoted by the mayor and implemented via an alternative process which avoided the opportunity for the ratepayers of Rotorua to call for a referendum on this contentious issue.

One of the major objections to having unelected Maori members sitting around the council table was that they would inherently advocate for the interests of Te Arawa and not the Rotorua community at large. Many would suggest that this in fact has been the case.

Furthermore, this unheralded change in governance of the Rotorua Lakes Council was seen by the majority of ratepayers as totally undemocratic, and this remains the case today.

Wouldn't it be interesting to have such a referendum today?
MIKE MCVICKER Rotorua

NZ Herald 26/5/18 (A quick word section)
John Tamihere, and some other Maori leaders, will have to get used to the idea, that “money for Maori” is going to end. The Waitangi Tribunal is 43 years old. The time is approaching, for Maoridom to stand on their own feet, without special support. I think they can do it, I hope they do, and become stronger for it.
REX BEER, Manly.

Gisborne Herald 25/5/18 
CULTURAL CAPTURE OVER THE TOP
We seem to have a council suffering from selective hearing. If you do not like what is going on in council, put pen to paper.

The superb letter by Roger Handford said it all. It is also good to see the return to this page of Mike Mulrooney. He has been sorely missed. Perhaps some sensibility will return.

Will this council ever listen to the will of the people and actually answer the questions so many are asking?

What was the cost of the waka at the GDC entranceway and who made it?

How much are the cultural consultants etc going to get for their input into the new airport terminal?

What did the concrete adzes cost at the library?

For goodness sake GDC, give us the answers.

Why do we need so much “cultural input” into every project our council decides to go ahead with?

Do they not realise we are a community of more than one culture?

I am sick and tired of seeing countless questions put forward that are disregarded.

Do not hide behind gobbledegook. Just tell us in plain English, Meng.

The sooner the next election arrives the better.

In Pat and Malcolm we at least have two councillors we trust. There sure are members there who are well past their use-by date.

How many of these councillors change their minds like we change our underwear? One day its “blab-blab-blab”, the next it is “wah-wah-wah”. I think it is called “running with the horses and hunting with the hounds”.

Are councillors not elected to follow the will of the people?

I wait with baited breath to see if more of you will stand against the hierarchy. Are any of you brave enough?

I am not going to hide behind a nom de plume like so many of the contributors to this page. Be brave.
BRIAN EMERSON
PS: I am also very much against the name change of Poverty Bay. A lot of us are very happy to say we are from Poverty Bay — not from a place people don’t know and can’t say.

New Zealand Herald 25/5/18 
PROTECTION WAS IDEA
I am intrigued to learn that once again Vincent O’Malley is applying his special brand of historical research in an attempt to unseat John Logan Campbell as the father of Auckland.

Ngati Whatua, led by Te Kawau, was merely the last of a number of tribes that occupied the place we now call Auckland. In the 150 years before 1840 the area changed hands a number of times. As late as 1827 the French explorer D’Urville was surprised to find the place virtually empty.

When Te Kawau and other chiefs approached Hobson to set up the capital in Auckland he did so as insurance. It could be claimed that what O’Malley suggests was an invitation to Hobson, could be better explained as a plea. Protection was his objective.
MURRAY REID, Tuakau


AUCKLAND’S FATHER
Who was the father of Auckland? Having read the work of Russell Stone (for whom I have enormous respect) among others, I sensed that, initially at least, Logan Campbell would rather have lived in the old world but came back to protect his business interests.

He did come to like the place and was a generous benefactor to the city, even if he didn’t much like making the beer that sustained his personal economy.

But then he came here as a speculator only because William Hobson decided, on advice, to move the capital to the Waitemata. So should we call Hobson the grandfather of Auckland? It’s true he was invited, mainly for protection, by local Maori, so maybe Hobson should be Auckland’s great uncle.

But wait, there’s more! My understanding is that before the musket wars of the 1820s, the isthmus was prosperous and populous, almost urban in its active life. So where do these Maori fit into the city's family tree?

It’s great argument and a lot of fun, meaningless in many ways, but it does generate a rich feeling of belonging to this place.
GORDON MCLAUCHLAN, Auckland Central


SHADY DEALS
Before Dr Vincent O'Malley gets carried away with political correctness, I suggest he reads John Logan Campbell's Poenamo.

Campbell and William Webster walked from Orakei to Mangere prior to Auckland being settled, seeking to buy the land on the north-facing slope of Remuera (Mt Hobson). Wisely Chief Apihai Te Kawau refused, because it was their growing land, and offered the land where Auckland's CBD stands today.

Whatever the government paid for the land, and the criminal prices they on-sold it, mostly to their cronies, one wonders how much of the government's profit was spent on the 500-dozen bottles of wine found in the government house cellar after Governor Shortland's departure in 1843.

It seems from the outset Auckland's governance was tainted with shady deals.
CLARK JAMES, New Lynn

Bay of Plenty Times 25/5/18 
MOVING FORWARD
The vote against the Maori wards reflects the feelings of the majority of people. Any other outcome would have been, in my view, a step closer to apartheid.

Let’s be clear — Maori can do everything non-Maori can, but there is still too much credence given to Maori-only interests — by any other name, in my opinion, that is division and separatism. This has got to stop and we must move forward as one people.
DON FINLAYSON Tauranga

Hawkes Bay Today 25/5/18 
HAPPY WANDERER
Re W Wellwood's letter (May 19): the old track on the eastern side of Te Mata Peak is described in the 1993 edition of Hawke's Bay for the Happy Wanderer by Sheila Cunningham. I walked the track many years ago.
B SMITH Taradale


IWI OUT OF STEP
I am appalled at the arrogance of the local iwi "leaders" who suggest that they can insist what landowners can and cannot do with their freehold land.

Moreover, when they do not get their way, they then resort to racial abuse and revisionist history to support their cause.

The predictable and very unhelpful outcome of iwi statements has been to racially polarise the community.

Craggy Range went through the legally required process to get consent to build the track, and it was granted.

Throughout New Zealand, landowners have obligations to abide by the law in respect of the use of their land, and the consequences of the way they use that land, but are in no other way answerable to any authority, tribal or otherwise.

The miserable turnout at the protests against the track demonstrates that it is iwi, not Craggy Range, that is out of step with the rest of society.

I support fully Craggy Range management and owners in using their land in a legal way that benefits the community at large. (Abridged)
ANDREW RENTON-GREEN Otane

New Zealand Herald 24/5/18 
MAORI WARDS
I see that results are in from referendums held to ask local body ratepayers if they think there should be extra wards (ie councillors) for Maori. The result is that all five local bodies turned Maori wards down by significant votes of between 56 per cent and 80 per cent.

This should send a clear message to the few who have been trying to introduce Maori wards, that the people overwhelmingly do not believe it is a good idea; for reasons that are obvious — let’s come together, not move further apart.
REX BEER, Manly.

Hawkes Bay Today 23/5/18 
TRACK DIRECTION
The front page of Monday's HB Today has the prominent heading "We'll keep coming back until something is done" regarding the Craggy Range track

A number of those quoted at a protest last Saturday gave explanations as to their opposition to the track remaining and I was disappointed to read their one-dimensional views.

I, too, will continue to advocate the retention of the track and the opportunity for many to walk it and the opening it could well give Ngati Kahungunu to make the community more aware of their historical connection to this should be given due consideration.

In fact, a number of correspondents indicated they have learned a great deal more of the history of the Te Mata Peak range from the articles published than they had ever been previously aware.

It would seem that many at Craggy Range last Saturday also failed to appreciate the lengths to which Craggy Range management and the Hastings District Council have gone in endeavouring to find a solution which will not leave the area in a worse state, as it would seem that landscape architects have indicated is very likely, should the track be removed.

Whatever the result of the current negotiations regarding the track's future it is obvious that not all will be happy with the outcome and I can only but hope that rather than "drive a chasm between us", we will continue to respect the differing views many have expressed so far with regard to Te Mata Peak and its iconic landscape.
RALPH HARPER Havelock North

The Press 22/5/18 
COLUMNISTS MISS THEIR MARKS
Yesterday's opinion piece by Jane Bowron on the royal wedding (the bride "a bit of ravishing rough") does her and The Press no favours.

Bowron is well-experienced in writing shock journalism - the sort of piece which rambles through smart remarks and outrageous comments to no conclusion that a literate reader can find -but this is near her worst.

But her piece was well-placed on the same page as Joel Maxwell, your new columnist who is polite but rambling.

All his columns encourages us to support to reo Maori, but if he is likely to be writing in that language as well I may have to miss it.

He also presents only a blur of thoughts, and no clear message. It seems to me that we are now missing more than just the bottom half of each page.
JOHN BURN, Merivale

Bay of Plenty Times 22/5/18 
LET’S HAVE ONE RULE FOR ALL
Congratulations people for a clear result on Maori wards in the Western Bay of Plenty District Council. I am very pleased that so many of you and I share the same view.

We, as Kiwis, have moved on in the world of decision-making and do not want one person to be worth more than another when getting to, or while at the decision-making table.

There is a saying that two wrongs don’t make a right and any reference to representation in “The Treaty” would now be wrong.

While I support Maori on many issues, including their land, I believe we all have the same rights when being elected to local and central government.

We are relatively free of discrimination in who can stand for these positions and who can vote other than Maori and Maori seats.

The European and Maori should compete for the same seats, as should any other Kiwi. If you are a Kiwi, then we all have the same privileges and responsibilities.

Those who choose to live here, no matter what race or creed, should all enjoy our “all are one” way of life.
ALLAN SOLE, Athenree

Hawkes Bay Today 22/5/18 
LET’S START THINKING POSITIVELY ABOUT TRACK
What is done is done.

Why can’t we make something good out of a bad situation?

My thoughts are, what do we know about the history of Te Mata Peak and its significance to Maori? I, like a lot of people, no doubt, have no idea.

Why can’t we put resting seats on the corners of the track on the way up and alongside the seats put up signs like the Department of Conservation has done on some of our famous walking tracks around New Zealand, explaining the history and significance of those tracks?

Ngati Kahungunu could write in both te reo and English explaining the history of hills of Te Mata Peak. It could become a popular activity for young and old, plus the many tourists we have coming to Hawke’s Bay.

Let’s just stop all the bitterness and controversy this has caused. Life is too short.
SUE HILL, Hastings

Northland Age 22/5/18 
TERRIBLE WRONGS
Interesting article in the paper today about Taika Waititi saying what Maori suffered during the 20th century, but says nothing about what the Maori did to the pre-Maori people in the 1700-1800s. Maori themselves must also put right the terrible wrongs they have done to the first inhabitants of New Zealand.

The Ngati Hotu, Celts, Patupaiarehe, Turehu — over 3000 in the land between Taupo, Ruapehu and Tarewa, perished in the killing and cannibalism through this time. The original peoples of New Zealand believed to have numbered 100,000 prior to the Maori.

There was the slaughter of the Chatham Island Moriori, the Ngati Kapupungapunga, who were wiped out to the last member of the tribe, making Tainui’s conquest genocide.

Twenty-one crew members from a Spanish shipwreck called Cicillia Maria were killed and eaten by Maori.

There was the slaughter of Ngati Hotu in the Battle of the Five Forts between Kakahi and the Whanganui River, also the battle of Pukekaikiore (Hill of the Meal of the Rats), plus many other killings.

The truth is that most New Zealanders live in deniaL They don't or won't admit the proven facts of this country. Taika Waititi, and you say Mgori were hard done by.
IAN BROUGHAM Wanganui

Dominion Post 22/5/18 
TEACH CODING
Mr Rochfort writes (Letters, May 18) of the valued Maori contribution to tourists' discretionary spending in New Zealand.

But it can be turned off like a tap during a recession or global financial crisis. It remains to be seen if it is sustainable in the long term.

Re. an alternative: NZ's likely future technology earnings.

Apple's Tim Cook thinks the most important thing worldwide children should learn is computer coding.

Ours will soon make an impact here.

"This is a language that you can [use to] express yourself to 7 billion people in the world," Cook said, adding that coding should be "required in every public school in the world" and should not be seen as a specialised skill.

Coding has priority over second languages.

Cook is not known as a racist.

I mostly agree with Don Brash, completely with Tim Cook, and hardly at all with your correspondent. His view is insular.
KEN MARTIN, Waterloo

Waikato Times 22/5/18 
BUDGET COMPLAINTS
It is sad to see Maori complaining about the Budget.

Over the years, they have been given millions, of which most is kept at the top of the heap.

Why do Maori feel they need to be given special packages when they can also access mainstream services the same as every other person in New Zealand?

Surely some of the billions from Treaty settlements should have started to trickle down to the bottom of the heap.

It seems to me the team at the top are focused on building empires and not helping those in need with housing and health solutions.

From my own experience, my own tribe spend more time arguing about who will negotiate the settlement than they do getting on with it.

Go to Australia and see Maori of all ages just getting on with life and not waiting for the next handout. No handouts there.
GORDON WALKER, Otorohanga
  
Dominion Post 21/5/18 
GET OFF THE SOAP BOX
It amazes me that this shrinking newspaper devotes so much of its print to Joel Maxwell's pious, emotive rants.

To Joel, for heaven's sake, get off your soap box and stop making ridiculous statements, so numerous that I won't begin to quote them.

My suggestion is that you take some time out from your language studies and delve into the history of the pre-Treaty of Waitangi Maori.

Have a look at the way Maori all but wiped out the Moriori, the first settlers of New Zealand.

Check out the violence inflicted on each other, over land and retribution, or the enslavement and cannibalism of warring factions.

I'm sure it will give you a more rounded outlook on your newly acquired ancestry and you'll be able to write with more humility and honesty.

In return, Ill attempt to pronounce Maori correctly.
LORRAINE CARGILL, Peka Peka
 
Herald on Sunday 20/5/18 
ENGLISH ASSIGNMENT
There is a proposal to make te reo teaching compulsory for schoolchildren. I think we have a much more pressing requirement to address.

At a North Shore primary school, in my grandchild's class there are less than 10 per cent who have English as their first language.

The teachers are swamped with the requirement to teach basic English before they are able to progress to basic lessons that are on the curriculum.

Surely all new immigrant children should go to a dedicated English teaching school paid for by their parents prior to entering the mainstream schools.
VINCE WEST, Milford

Bay of Plenty Times 19/5/18 
CAST RACIAL DIVISION ASIDE, ONE LAW FOR ALL
I write in support of C Humphreys (Letters, May 7).

Thank goodness there are a few leaders in our community like her expressing majority public opinion. Seems some current councillors are from a different planet from us ordinary folks. I also worry sometimes about balance in the press.

I often say, central and local government politicians should spend four hours a month standing on a street corner, talking to people of all races and denominations, and reconnecting with ordinary Kiwis.

Some friends and I sat on the street for some days then knocked on over 600 doors in Katikati with a petition, connecting with our people, the ones who fund the council. If only current politicians did this and abandoned what is, in my opinion, the politically correct theories, staff wishes, the racial nonsense, the manipulation of the real Treaty, and instead represent truth and reality and the aspirations in 2018 of Kiwis of all races in our multi-racial society.

Racial division should be cast aside and divisive politics abandoned. We should embrace one law for all and equal rights independent of skin colour, religion or politics.

We are all one people, let’s recognise that, and next election cast aside those local body politicians who live in the past and play the race card. Here’s to a good future together. (Abridged)
NORM MAYO Katikati

Nelson Mail 19/5/18 
TE REO ‘NONSENSE’
It seems unfair to criticise the Nelson Mail for publishing an article on the Nelson School of Music name change (May 7). It does concern many people.

But how about those articles by Joel Maxwell (Nelson Mail, April 30) and Nanaia Mahuta (May 9)? Never have I read such a condescending lot of nonsense. These matters have gone the way such things do.

There is not a scrap of sense in making the Maori language compulsory. English should be taken more seriously by all. That would stand the kids especially in better stead – from every point of view.

If some want to immerse themselves in te reo, fine, but let it be a personal choice.

If anything, it would make more sense if those who want to learn more languages put their time and effort into learning a language spoken by many around the world, eg Chinese or Japanese or Spanish.

Maori may be sad about seeing their language disappear, but it is ‘‘one of those things’’.

When I think of my homeland’s history – how often it has been overrun. That is how progress happened. Every conqueror left good things behind.

Hopefully, we now live in a better period (without fighting), but we cannot put the clock back.
ALBERTHA KUIPERS Richmond,

Hawkes Bay Today 19/5/18 
SALUTE SHARING OF TRACK
The ownership of land carries with it certain responsibilities. In a truly remarkable display of understanding, public spiritedness and generosity Craggy Range have agreed to share their iconic land with us all. We should be responding by singing their praises from the summit of Te Mata Peak.
BRIAN PATTULLO Havelock North


DON'T ESCALATE ISSUE
Ngahiwi Tomoana's emotive rants do nothing to solve the problems regarding the track but seem more inclined to stir up non-existing racial tension.

This whole affair seems to be developing into a p***** contest between Ngahiwi and a sensible solution guided by information provided by all and any landscape specialists.

Solve the problem. Don't escalate it.
MURRAY CHRISTISON Napier

Weekend Sun / Sunlive 18/5/18 
MAORI DON’T STAND
Mr Dey (The Weekend Sun, May 11), once more you have let your enthusiasm interfere with the facts. You state that Maori candidates for election in councils are disadvantaged by the number of non-Maori voters. There are no Maori candidates! They do not stand for election.

In the present parliament there are 25 per cent of Maori members including the Leader and Deputy Leader of the National Party from 14.9 per cent of the population. One can scarcely call that under-representation. But those MPs stood for office, which Maori do not do in local body elections.
B JOHNSON, Omokoroa.

Bay of Plenty Times 18/5/18 
MAORI ROLL
People eligible for the Maori roll are currently being given the chance to choose to stay there or opt for the general roll.

Nationally more than 2000 have left the Maori roll just one month into the Maori Election Option process.

The provisional number of people in Western Bay of Plenty District at the 2017 census was 49,000 of which 7840 (16 per cent) were Maori. The Electoral Commission reports that for WBOP District there are 33,409 on the general roll and 3166 on the Maori roll giving a total of 36,575 enrolled voters. Only 8.6 per cent of those enrolled are on the Maori roll.

This means that only about half of enrolled Maori voters are on the Maori roll. If WBOP District follows the national trend the number will be decreasing.

This is one more reason why we should not have Maori wards.
KEITH HAY Waihi Beach

Hawkes Bay Today 18/5/18 
TRACK ENHANCES PEAK’S MANA
With all due respect to Dr Susan Jacob’s letter regarding the Te Mata Peak track it would seem she failed to appreciate a number of points I made in the Talking Point view on May 15.

The Te Mata Peak range as a whole has already seen areas of development, so I would suggest if “mana” is a criteria for undisturbed landscape and recognition of tangata whenua historical connection, then the peak “mana” has well and truly been compromised, and again it would seem many are being selective in the way they comment on the track’s siting on one relatively small area of private land on the eastern face.

It would be my contention that the creation of this track has been instrumental in seeing this “mana” if anything enhanced by the creation of access for all to another aspect of our unique landscape, and view it as unfortunate that perhaps tangata whenua did not see the opportunity to share with the community their views as to ways they might have positively enhanced recognition of their history of, and connection to, this area by joining or supporting the development to give more of their perspective in a tangible way.

I doubt if I have ever been more taken aback by the views of a community leader as to those expressed in a letter to Craggy Range’s Mary-Jeanne Hutchinson by Ngati Kahungunu chairman Ngahiwi Tomoana as to a number of claims he makes in that letter, many of which I view as unfortunate in the debate with regard to the district council’s consent process and the legal ramifications of restoring the track and the ethnicity and location of those who have involved themselves with the discussion on the track’s future.

The question has also yet to be answered as to where district councillor Bayden Barber and Waimarama Maori were during the time the track was under construction and why their concerns regarding the development have come after the fact.
RALPH HARPER, Havelock North


GOOD FOR TOURISM
In Waipukurau on Pukeora Hill is the Forest of Memories. Walking tracks, seating and plantings. The Te Mata Peak walking track could become more attractive by following this idea. Good for tourism and local use and more attractive for everyone.

Also something explaining the history and significance to local iwi displayed for the track users.This may help to get people interested and respectful of this local landmark.

Better a walking track than another subdivision of houses on the hillside.

Enjoy the view and the beauty of the bay from this landmark instead of moaning. Work towards improving the track for everyone to enjoy.

Why make big lawyers’ bills instead of something many can enjoy for years to come.
WADE MANNELL Hastings


MOTIVATION?
Mr Tomoana what was your motivation in releasing your letter to the media published in HB Today May 15?

Can I suggest you were anticipating an angry hostile response from the "lycra brigade" which you could then use as evidence to further your argument that the placement of the track has created a "racist one-way tirade".

The only person that is fuelling racial tension around this matter is you.

I am a 60-plus woman who has lived in Hawke's Bay all my life. I haven't worn lycra in years, I don't own the latest SUV and I don't live in Havelock North, I just happen to believe the track is a great addition to our landscape.
LEE HEAPS Haumoana 
  
Waikato Times 17/5/8 
COMPULSORY TE REO
The call to make the learning of te reo compulsory is unreasonable, while the suggestion that it might become our first language preposterous. It is not surprising that such expectations are created, given the caving-in of politicians in the context of the perpetual scramble for marginal votes. The urgent priority is to get the English language back on track after two generations of education neglect at the hands of semi-literate liberals.

To communicate effectively, the message must mean the same thing to both the originator and the receiver. Poor standards of syntax, pronunciation, spelling and punctuation do the damage. Where punctuation is lacking, statements are often ambiguous (equivalent to gabbling the spoken word). Professors who say that punctuation is elitist are ignorant and should not be in a position to perpetuate the damage to our language.

Proponents of te reo castigate us for mispronouncing Maori words, yet the abuse of English is a national pastime. I can frequently find errors in some newspapers’ editorial musings. Aircrew pilots from all non-English speaking countries are obliged to use English for their communications with air traffic control. Let us not get carried away with ridiculous posturing on the learning of te reo.
HUGH WEBB, Hamilton

Northland Age 17/5/18 
BY DEFINITION
It continues to amaze and dismay me how so many of our fellow citizens, exemplified by your letter writers Peter Kerr and Richard Gravenor (May 15), claim that our part-Maori are, on the one hand, indigenous to New Zealand, and, on the other hand, under-privileged. Presumably these are examples of what comes from habitually watching the TV news.

Let’s get it straight. Despite that Peter Kerr, and probably others, claim that I am indigenous if I choose to call myself indigenous, the rest of us, endowed with sanity and some understanding of logic, discard such a claim as rubbish.

Despite Mr Kerr’s convenient misinterpretation of the Oxford English Dictionary (a British authority), native and indigenous are not identical and interchangeable. I was born in New Zealand, therefore I am native to New Zealand. But I’m not of a race indigenous to New Zealand. Indigenous means “naturally existing in a place or country rather than arriving from another place” (Cambridge English dictionary), as the Maori arrived from Taiwan. Even the earlier settlers wiped out by the Maori, or almost, are not indigenous.

As for Mr Gravenor’s claim that partMaori are under-privileged, nothing really could be further from the truth.

The pro-Maori racist privileges institutionalised now are so blatant as to not need cataloguing for anyone with a little bit of awareness and integrity.
Good Grief
LEO LEITCH, Napier

Bay of Plenty Times 17/5/18 
BE COUNTED
Peter Dey, once more you have let your enthusiasm interfere with the facts (Letters, May 4).

You state that Maori candidates for election in councils are disadvantaged by the number of non-Maori voters.

Mr Dey, Maori candidates do not stand for election. In the present parliament, there are 25 per cent Maori members including the leader and deputy leader of the National Party from 14.9 per cent of the population. One can scarcely call that underrepresentation.

But those MPs stood for office, which Maori do not do in local body elections.
BRYAN JOHNSON, Omokoroa

Hawkes Bay Today 17/5/18 
BIG DAMAGE TO REPUTATION
It is a great pity that a few professional stirrers are smearing the character of so many generous flexible New Zealanders of Maori and part Maori and any other descent you like to name who can see the benefit of exercise on everyone's health regardless of ethnic origin of walking the Te Mata Craggy Range owned track.

Why a select few think they have the God-given right to try and prevent the majority of an opportunity to exercise is beyond me.

If it was suggested the Maori Iron Man was not to take place on public let alone private land all hell would break loose.

I fail to see any difference between these two forms of exercise —both should be encouraged and it should not be the prerogative of a select few to dictate to the majority.

The Brisbane Queensland family who own the Craggy Range Winery are highly respected and extremely well known Queenslanders and Terry Peabody is considered one of Queensland's chosen and favourite sons and to subject him to this type of attack will damage the reputation of all New Zealanders living in Australia and their chances of being treated equally with other migrants in Australia.
JON PHILIP SMITH Havelock North


CREATING BEAUTY
According to Dr Susan Jacobs, "this side of Te Mata has special meaning to many of us Pakeha just because it was unspoiled beauty."

This seems like a very romantic notion as having enjoyed this vista many times and reviewed some of the recent photos, I find it hard to believe how anyone could describe this as unspoiled beauty. The landscape consists largely of land that has been cleared and turned into pasture. Complete with barbed wire fencing demarcating paddocks for grazing beef and sheep, with the occasional exotic tree.

Surely Craggy Range's proposal to reinstate some of the native flora and fauna, goes some way towards recreating the true unspoiled beauty of this area.
GREG HINTON Napier


BITTER WALK
I’m disappointed that Ngahiwi Tomoana has become so bitter over the new walkway over Te Mata Peak.

Maybe he could take his mokopuna (grandchildren) on the walkway and explain to them the significance of Te Mata Peak.

He was never like that at school (Karamu High).

I work in the hospitality industry, and meet a lot of people ... and so far I have heard no negative comments about the walkway. With some constructive planting it will be invisible and you probably won't even notice it . It appears Mr Tomoana has become myopic and can't see further down the track.
ROGER WRIGHT Hastings

Dominion Post 16/5/18 
OPPORTUNITY COSTS
Joel Maxwell argues that learning te reo Maori in schools should be compulsory. But as AUT history professor Paul Moon argued in his book Killing Te Reo Maori, "the most compelling reason to avoid compulsion [to learn te reo] is that it has a consistent record of failure when it comes to reviving indigenous languages."

As an economist, I always want to know the cost of doing something new— not just the dollar cost (and making te reo compulsory would be very expensive) but also the opportunity cost.

What would we have to give up to have Maori taught to every pupil? Perhaps fewer nurses in our hospitals, or fewer early childhood teachers? What would need to be dropped from the school curriculum to make time for te reo classes — less maths perhaps, or less English, less physical education?

Off-hand, I can think of nothing that is less useful to most pupils than learning to reo, a language which has not the slightest value to most New Zealanders in gaining employment here or overseas.

Yes, learning a second language has apparent benefits in brain development, but let's make it a language of long-term benefit to our children.
DON BRASH, Auckland

The Press 16/5/18 
SUPPRESSED TE REO?
Columnist Joel Maxwell (May 14) is commendably enthusiastic in advocating compulsory te reo in schools.

But his assertion that "the language of my ancestors was the subject of generations of compulsion by the later arrivals in Aotearoa" is belied by the evidence.

Reports prepared by the Ministry of Education every year since 1877 show there never were any such policies.

There is certainly a widely circulated mythology that there was widespread and regular punishment of children who spoke Maori at school.

But our educational authorities have been strongly supportive of the notion that Maori should be encouraged to retain their own language and culture.

It is true that English was the medium of instruction in Maori schools. But there were good reasons for that, not least of which was the fact that that was what most Maori parents and leaders, such as Sir Apirana Ngata, wanted.

It is simply not true that the Maori language languished because of repressive education policies and I invite Maxwell and others to research the matter.
JOHN FLETCHER, Avonhead

Otago Daily News 16/5/18 
SAMWELL’S JOURNALS GIVE GOOD HISTORY OF ‘OTAGO’
THE first record of the name Otago appeared in the diaries of David Samwell.

Samwell recorded and transcribed hakas in the Marlborough Sounds in 1777. Otago appears as Otagoo. It may well have been rendered in the dialect of a tribe we would describe as Rangitane.

A considerable amount can be learned from Samwell’s journals — since he recorded the interaction of peoples wherever he went, throughout the Pacific.

He was a witness to the death of James Cook in Hawaii. Being a Welsh speaker, he had an ear and a flair for language.

The question of whether to call the whole province Otakou is interesting and timely. Our family has numerous links to Kai Tahu — a daily interaction. Rather than quibble about a name, I would like to see our iwi and hapu expand organically and establish new forwardlooking hapu, wherever the tribe sits.

The old bases — or palaces — on the coast, serve us well. But it is time to expand and to establish new names.

Toroa nui, toroa roa, toroa iti i te hauiti.
The saying is about the albatross — unless we have wind to fly we are nothing.
DAVID GEORGE, Cromwell

New Zealand Herald 16/5/18 
TAINUI WITH KIDSCAN
It is good to see Tainui contributing to Kidscan to help feed predominantly Maori children in schools in their tribal area.

Since Maori have a $50 billion collective wealth from Treaty payments and subsequent investments over the past 20 years, some might wonder why it has taken so long to take steps to help those of their iwi and hapu who can’t feed their children.

Some also might wonder why ceremony is needed with powhiri, politicians et al to celebrate the donation.

And why is the Government involving itself? Wasn’t one of their first moves to refuse to continue funding of Kidscan, a move they now say they are reconsidering?
KATHERINE SWIFT, Kohimarama.

Hawkes Bay Today 16/5/18 
IN GOOD FAITH
So many issues have arisen because of this great walkway — a walkway created in good faith by a winery whose desire was to create something wonderful for the folk of Hawke’s Bay as well as visitors, on its own land, at its own cost.

I have walked the track myself and really enjoyed it.

I was deeply saddened on reading Ngahiwi Tomoana’s angry outburst in the paper. He is a man I very much admire and was really surprised at how vitriolic it was.

For me, I think, if what I read is true, the Hastings District Council gave the go-ahead for the track. I was really surprised that there was, at that time, no one on the council who was culturally up with the play concerning local Maori history in light of the fact that this is a province with a large Maori population.

I believe Mr Barber is of Maori heritage. Perhaps he was away at the time. Actually even if he was, he ought to have been contacted and consulted.

The fact the council says councillors will now have cultural training beggars belief, living where we do and the times we also live in.

It seems to me the ripples from errors made by Hastings District Council reach far and wide. The failure to upgrade the water infrastructure, resulting in all our water being chlorinated . . . no one in authority held accountable, with leaders from that time both gone.

The current fiasco over the walkway has the potential to continue to cause real damage and a rift in the community. Cragge Range’s Michael Wilding appears to be making a valiant effort to please all parties, which no doubt will be coming at considerable cost to the winery.

I love one-liners and, although I don’t like at all the one I’m about to quote, it sadly seems appropriate. “No good deed goes unpunished.”
MARY WOODFORD, Taradale

Northland Age 15/5/18 
SOLD OUT
If the majority of the New Zealand public are unaware that they have been sold out academically and spiritually by a corruption of the wording and intentions of the Treaty, it will be partly due to the media, who have been decidedly reluctant to keep them informed.

Churches and universities have accepted a revised version of the Treaty by forming alliances with Maori as partners. The Governor-General has also spoken of a unique partnership between Maori and the Crown, and in so doing has negated the position of the Royalty she represents, and made the Sovereign a partner with her subjects. The very wording makes this a non sequitur.

Clause 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi gave Maori the equal rights of all subjects of the Crown. No more. That the Anglican Church and the Salvation Army have accepted partnership, and the universities of Otago and Canterbury must consult academically with Ngai Tahu, whose leading kaumatua, Tipene O’Reagan is Maori, is an abrogation of the democratic principle of the equality of all citizens.

Two relevant matters need considering. First, Te Tiriti included all inhabitants of New Zealand at the time, and not just Maori.

Second, the Treaty only made New Zealand a dependency of the colony of New South Wales. The Queen's Charter, issued later, is the founding document. This makes reference to the Treaty irrelevant.

It is not surprising, but it is a cause for concern, that a section of the 15 per cent Maori population should be able to exercise such control. It will be interesting to see if any in the media counter their biased agendas and publishes this view of proceedings.
BRYAN JOHNSON Omokoroa


HISTORY DENIED
I have received numerous phone calls and correspondence regarding the government and how they are covering things up.

One copy of a document I received was an agreement in 1988 to transfer archives of archaeologists' reports on pre-Maori civilisation in New Zealand. There is nothing strange about this transfer, until you note its contents are embargoed until 2063. This raised serious alarm bells as to why the findings of a group of archaeologists needed to be kept secret for this length of time. Is there something in their findings that goes against current government policy, or does it contain definitive proof that Maori were not the first inhabitants of this country?

By keeping these facts hidden, the public are being denied their history.

So much for the transparency of government when history can be hidden and distorted to suit political ends.

Embargoing information like this shows how democracy in this country has gone out the window. The public are being denied information by the very politicians they elected.

We need a job description for politicians, one they must adhere to, with accountability to their constituents. This would enable the public to call politicians to answer for their actions, and if enough voters decide their representative was not doing what they were elected for they should be able to fire them and vote in someone else to replace them.

Government is by the people for the people, not the individuals elected to represent them.
PAUL REA Hawera

Wanganui Chronicle 15/5/18 
‘NGATI KIWI’
Potonga Neilson has whakapapa wrong. I, like him, am Ngati Kiwi — a New Zealander born and bred as were many of our ancestors.

In fact, if we follow are (sic) ancestry far enough back we will find common ancestors, so “cuz”, let’s fight together to make New Zealand a place where we and our children all have jobs and 80 per cent of the wealth of this country is not held in the hands of an overprivileged few.

The Irish were forced to disperse all around the world because of the destruction of the Commons, land held and used in common by the ordinary people — and that will happen here if the 500 or so iwi coastal claims are allowed to proceed.

The claims — which the Attorney General has described as “overlapping” — illustrate there was no “Maori Nation”, just a feuding set of tribes.

We are all human with a common whakapapa/ancestry and, if we look, can find ways to do better.

In my opinion, iwi and the rest of New Zealand are being deliberately divided to allow the rich and greedy to not only maintain control but to take as much of New Zealand’s land and wealth as they can.

Successive governments have put up millions of taxpayer dollars to support iwi claims, while forcing those who have counter claims that show there has not been continual and exclusive use by iwi to use their own money to go to the High Court.
TERRY O’CONNOR, Wanganui

Dominion Post 15/5/18 
TE REO IN SCHOOLS
Ben Birkett (Letters, March 17) is advocating that the Maori language (te reo Maori) "should be a big part of our school and any school", in order for all to learn about Maori culture.

He is likely to be an above-average student.

He does not say what level of schooling he has reached, or what he understands "culture" to be.

His position that knowledge of the Maori language is necessary for culture to be understood is not justified.

Teaching of the Maori language would reduce the time allocated to reading and writing English, and mathematics, the mainstays needed to provide people with a living.

It would adversely affect the teaching of English to immigrants having other mother tongues, for whom this is fundamental for survival in our society.

There is already a shortage of teachers. Adding Maori language teaching will require even more. [abridged]
MIKE WILLIAMS, Tawa

Dominion Post 14/5/18 (Also published in the Waikato Times 14/5/18) 
I'M TANGATA WHENUA
Kate Frykberg (Voice of Maori should be heard, May 11) used the term "tangata whenua" a great deal, which to my understanding means "people of the land".

Are we not all "people of this land"? Why are some more and others less?

She also stated that non-Maori have the opportunity to live here because of the Treaty, but this is factually incorrect. I for one have the right to live here because I was born here, my parents were born here and because I am a citizen, of equal value and rights as any other Kiwi. I too am tangata whenua (a person of this land).

She talks about harmony and then promotes disharmony. She seems to be confused between wards based on area (rural wards) and race-based wards, which are not at all the same thing.

Treating people differently because of their race is the very meaning of racism.

If you want a wider range of councillors to represent the community, then the councils should better fund the electoral process. Not set up an apartheid political structure, that segregates people by race.

As an old Maori saying goes, "what are the three most important things in life? It is the people, the people, the people" -all of them.

Harmony is a colour blind world, where everyone has the same rights. Long live freedom, brotherhood and equality. [abridged]
BRENT PIERSON, Kingston

Taranaki Daily News 14/5/18 
ACCOUNTABILITY
Since my last letter, I have received numerous phone calls and correspondence regarding the Government and how they are covering things up.

One copy of a document I received was an agreement in 1988 to transfer archives of archaeologists reports on pre-Maori civilisation in New Zealand. There is nothing strange about this transfer until you note its contents are embargoed until 2063. This raised serious alarm bells as to why the findings of a group of archaeologists needed to be kept secret for this length of time. Is there something in their findings that goes against current Government policy or does it contain definitive proof that Maori were NOT the first inhabitants of this country. By keeping these facts hidden the public are being denied their history, so much for the transparency of Government when history can be hidden and distorted to suit political ends. By embargoing information like this it shows how democracy in this country has gone out the window.

The public are being denied information by the very politicians they elected. We need a job description for politicians, one they must adhere to with accountability to constituents. This would enable the public to call politicians to answer for their actions and if enough voters decide their representative was not doing what they were elected for they should be able to fire them and vote in someone else. Government is: By the people for the people- not the individuals elected to represent them.
PAUL REA Hawera

Bay of Plenty Times 12/5/18 
MAORI WARDS
Your frequent correspondent Peter Dey continues to maintain that Maori don't get a fair go in local body politics simply because their low numbers are overwhelmed. 
He doesn't seem to accept that the opposite is the case in national politics where many more Maori are elected than their percentage in the population.

If he is correct, could he please explain why there are so few Maori elected in Whakatane when they make up nearly half of the population? With such a powerful lobby as that, they should be in the majority in council.

My belief is the answer is very simple. Maori, as a whole, choose not to be involved. They tend not to vote and tend not to be on the roll.

It is well defined by a six-letter word starting with A. I also suspect that many Maori who do choose to be involved, are wary of those who might seek election. It is a matter of trust.

My major objection to Maori wards is that those elected will have a single focus. Today in our ward-based local body system all elected officials have a responsibility across the entire district. I consider that to be important.
MURRAY REID Tuakau

Nelson Mail 12/5/18 
DON BRASH
The word loser is a derogative term - and, reading on in Joel Maxwell's article about Don Brash (Nelson Mail, May 7), you will find plenty of other degrading and mocking references.

Maxwell may think his article is a bit of a joke - if so, it certainly falls flat in an ugly way (which is not at all mitigated by his grinning face below).

Brash is a winner in every sense of the word: he is an honourable, admirable, well-meaning person whose lifetime's work has been important and fruitftul for us all and for our country.
ANDY ESPERSEN Nelson,

Weekend Sun / Sunlive 11/5/18 
LIVING AS ONE UNDER THE SUN
If our forefathers made an agreement 178 years ago and over the next 50 years haven't honoured it that is their sin, not ours.

New Zealand has come a long way, with people of many colours, races, and creeds. Now is not the time to right what some see as a wrong by creating Maori wards for our future.

Don't belittle the successes of many Maori who have achieved by patronising actions like Maori wards. These people are valued because of success and lead the way.

My wife, a New Zealander of European descent, can't stand in Maori wards, nor can she vote in them. If I stood for a Maori ward she couldn't vote for me.

We are both Kiwis with roots in New Zealand history, but someone wants to divide us.

I was brought up with a song by the Maori show band The Kini Quartet called ‘Under the Sun'. A line says “In the land of the free like our own country, where our babies are taught as one, where they learn to be men lift up their faces and then, walk hand in hand, into the sun.”
A SOLE, Athenree.

Northern Advocate 11/5/18 
SEATS SELECTIVE
Re: Jo Skyrme’s letter “Equal Say”, May 8

Maori seat MPs are certainly democratically elected, but the actual seats are anything but democratic — being only open to those of selective ancestry.

The 1980s Royal Commission, which recommended we change to MMP, said race-based seats should be scrapped as they were totally unnecessary. That has proven to be the case.

Besides the seven race-based MPs, there are 22 general seat MPs (who happen to have Maori ancestry) in Parliament today. They got there on their own merits and several are in leadership roles of the five major parties.

Even under the old electoral system, the Maori seats were long considered redundant since all Maori men got the vote back in 1867.

That’s well before all men got a vote in 1879 and way before women in 1893.

The only reason the seats have been retained is that every party wants to benefit from the parliamentary distortion created by them. So yes, I have the best interests of all New Zealanders at heart.

As world history and current affairs prove every single day, this is irrevocably achieved by ensuring all citizens have the same rights and privileges, with absolutely no discrimination regarding race, gender or ancestry.
FIONA MACKENZIE Whangaparaoa

Northland Age 10/5/18 
DATE OF BIRTH
In 2004 a Maori delegation applied to The Hague for “indigenous status for Maori in New Zealand”, and were refused by this court, stating, “Maori are native, not indigenous to New Zealand”.

Labour is now considering compulsory Maori seats in its racist agenda. There may be more of others in Parliament, but Cabinet is overwhelmingly Maori due to the Treaty ‘principles’, derived not from the Treaty but from a treaty of Hugh Kawharu, which he called his “attempt at a reconstruction of the literal translation of the Maori text”.

Most certainly reconstructed, Hobson’s Treaty was written to conform with nonracist English law and condemned by Chief Justice Prendergast, as Maori did not qualify re the ‘Law of Nations’.

The Treaty was officially condemned as “a simple nullity” by Chief Justice Prendergast in New Zealand’s Supreme Court in 1877, a ruling which still stands.

Our true founding documents are the Royal Charter of 1839, which extended the boundaries of New South Wales to encompass “all of the islands of New Zealand”, and the one which separated us from New South Wales to become an independent British colony, the Royal Charter of 1840, ratified on May 3, 1841 (the day New Zealand was born).
IAN BROUGHAM, Wanganui

NZ Herald 10/5/18 (Short & Sweet section) 
ON TO REO
Rather than making the learning of the Maori language a compulsory subject in schools, I'd rather make managing money a compulsory subject.
PAMELA PUTLAND, RD Papakura.

Bay of Plenty Times 10/5/18 
MISTAKEN ISSUES
It is concerning that in the promotion of Maori ward petitions, many believed that the issue was over hospital wards for Maori or the appointing of Maori wardens, and voted accordingly.
BRYAN JOHNSON Omokoroa

The Press 9/5/18 
PRAISE FOR DON BRASH
It has been a long time since I have read such meaningless, mean spirited clap-trap as Joel Maxwell's column about Don Brash.

I have no idea who Maxwell is and what he has done for this country that we should take his rantings seriously.

I am, however, quite clear who Don Brash is and what he has done for this country and I am thankful he cares enough about New Zealand to keep on doing it.

Every New Zealander should read what he, and others, have to say on the Hobson's Pledge website.

Here you will not find Brash refer to anyone as a "loser" or make derogatory remarks about the way they look. You will not find derogatory comments, grudges or hare-brained generalisations about other ethnicities.

You will find instead reasoned arguments stated eloquently by mature people who are actually capable of intelligent debate and who, unlike Maxwell, have the greatest respect for people of all races.

Whether you agree with Brash or not is up to you but at the very least his is an honest and heartfelt attempt to take New Zealand to a better place. Personally I think that deserves the highest praise, not derision.
PIERS SEED, Burnside

Dominion Post 9/5/18 
IDENTITY ISSUES
Joel Maxwell, please deal with your daddy abandonment issues before writing your next column (You're a loser, Don, but I love you anyway, May 7). It's embarrassing. I predict, you do that, your identity issues will click right into place. In any event, I wish you god speed in dealing with all the stuff you've obviously got going on.
ANTHONY TAYLOR, Paraparaumu Beach

Northern Advocate 9/5/18 
FREEDOMS WON
What is hate speech? Is it hate speech to speak out against, or for the use of medicinal cannabis?

Is it hate speech to ask what will happen to the Western economy if genetically engineered food is proven to be toxic?

Is it hate speech to say all men are rapists?

What is being done to freedom of speech, in Sweden, under the banner of hate speech?

Lest we forget, the most dangerous hate speech of all is lying by omission that is lying by omitting to talk about it.

Lest we forget, they sacrificed everything for freedom including freedom of expression regardless of my or other’s offence.
KARL KING Dargaville

Dominion Post 8/5/18 
MISPLACED PRIDE
Re Joel Maxwell's diatribe (You're a loser, Don, but I love you anyway, May 7), this born-again Maori, a "half caste re-entering my culture", exhibits misplaced pride that apparently gives him the right to sneer at non-Maori.

If any of the latter had written about Maori in this fashion the race relations conciliators and commissioners would be steaming with righteous indignation.

Maxwell's high moral ground is, unfortunately, undermined by vast caverns of shame and a catalogue of wrongdoings on the part of "his" people: the burning of South Island forests, hunting birds to extinction, intertribal conflict, slavery, cannibalism, trading in tattooed heads and, currently, taking up most of the cells in the prisons.

He would be better occupied making more of an effort to live amicably among those he thinks of as despoilers and deadbeats. They have actually given him a settled way of life. [abridged]
ALLEN HEATH, Woburn

Northland Age 8/5/18 
JUST DESSERTS
The Local Government NZ outfit is a joke.

Currently five of its councils are facing polls on the question of Maori wards. President Cull has written an open letter to Ms Mahuta, Minister of Local Government, whinging about the legitimate polls on race-based council Maori ward seats.

Well these LGNZ bozos had it coming to them, because in most cases elected members had never promoted this aberration on their 2016 electoral platforms. Once elected, then they sought to stick voters with their own race-based mindsets and little agendas, usually without consultation that is not democracy. It's unacceptable authoritarian behaviour.

Remember, a poll doesn't guarantee the proposal will not succeed, so where is the problem? It is simply giving local voters a say, not blindsiding them. There's nothing wrong with having referendums on all major issues, but LGNZ clearly know the public are not with them on race-based Maori ward seats, and that there is no place in New Zealand for race-based politics or specially reserved representation based on ethnicity.

As someone opposed to local authority wards per se, I have no problem in extending the right to call for a poll on all council ward seats, because I believe community boards and other committees can address any special local issues that may arise.
ROB PATERSON Mt Maunganui


A LEAKING WAKA
I'm about one-quarter Jewish, from both sides of the family, with Irish, Scottish and English blood and goodness knows what else. I have no Maori blood but ever since a small boy have listened to the old people tell their stories and have been at home in a marae environment over many years. My roots in New Zealand my country, go back 174 years.

Maori history goes back perhaps 1000 years in Aotearoa. It hasn't been easy sailing. Cultural clash, disease, war, depressions, floods and earthquakes. Injustice being defeated by law and order step by step but often taking too long.

These islands have bred reformers, scientists, artists, poets, and many great men and women out of proportion to our size.

Environmentally we have made mistakes we are starting to correct. Our farmers and workers of the land are world leaders.

Unfortunately greed, and the lust for power, which has been present in the world since apple trees existed and Adam took a bite, has been a component of our society since kick-off.

There should be no depressed adults or children being destroyed by drugs and lack of hope in our beautiful islands. Things need to change as too many mistakes have been made politically, by all parties. All share the blame.

Political slagging matches assisted by an often right wing mass media are outdated. It just means more of the same, which doesn't work. Parliamentarians need to get real, face facts and come to a consensus, as we are all in the same waka that's leaking badly, especially in the stern.
SAM McHARG Kerikeri

Hawkes Bay Today 8/5/18 
KIWI SPEAK
So, Taika Waititi suggests New Zealand is a racist country because people don't pronounce Maori words correctly.

Many Maori words are taken from the English language and are mispronounced due to the different alphabet ranges. One example is Waititi's own name, Taika, which is the Maori way of saying "tiger", according to my Dictionary of Modern Maori Language.

Much of the mispronunciation comes from our TV and radio reporters using such names as Taipaw, Fonganui or Fongaray. Other such words which would be made clearer if pronounced correctly would be kura, pahi, hikareti and puka puka. Is this racism or laziness?

On the other side of the coin, there are many English language words that are being massacred by, supposedly, English-speaking people, eg "I'm jus gonna go to the stoa in th cah to get a doa" — and even a most prominent politician refers to "sumpnink" with monotonous regularity.

The English language has evolved over hundreds of years with the inclusion of words from many countries.

How about we wait annuver coupla hunnert years to see how our Kiwi speak evolves without involving any acrimonious discussions?
ALEX BRACEY Hastings

Bay of Plenty Times 8/5/18 
LAND PAYMENTS
We are surprised the Anglican Bishop of Waiapu will revisit land sales at the General Synod (News, April 30). If they do, they will be able to correct the statement that: “The land was given in trust to the Church Missionary Society”.

The facts are as follows:
* Reverend Alfred Nesbit Brown, on behalf of the Church Missionary Society (CMS), on October 30, 1838, purchased the 30 acres (12ha) of land at the northern tip of the Te Papa peninsula.

* On March 30, 1939, an additional 1334 acres was purchased by the CMS with deeds of sale signed by local chiefs.

* Governor Hobson, after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, set up a commission to review all land purchases made pre-1840, which found the CMS purchases were conducted with willing parties, with goods exchanged on settlement.

* In 1867 CMS reluctantly relinquished about 1067 acres of Te Papa land to the Government to establish a settlement.

* In 1873 the Browns bought 17 acres of land from CMS, renaming it The Elms.

* In 1882 Tauranga was gazetted as a borough.

Today visitors to The Elms can see the full list of CMS’ settlement items that were accepted as payment for the land. To suggest that the Anglican Church predecessors held the land “in trust” is not supported by facts.
JIM SHERLOCK Friends of The Elms chairman

Bay of Plenty Times 7/5/18 
WEDGE OF HATE
“Pale, stale male” is, in my view, as racist as you can get.

I believe Tommy Wilson (Opinion, April 30) and Peter Dey (Letters, April 28) are the ones playing the race card.

In my opinion, people like them are persistently driving a wedge of hate between us all. I challenge both to try changing the attitude here, it is cruel to all Kiwis.

We are all intermarried, have part Maori children and grandchildren. Why should we have to choose a side, dividing families? This is dividing our country. “United we stand, divided we fall”, you better believe it.

The wording of the signs around the district promoting a vote for Maori wards is a joke, how can we be “Moving forward together”, but have separate Maori wards? Sounds like separatism to me.

The Treaty says we are one people and that is democracy, anything else is demeaning.

As has been said, there are 29 people with Maori heritage in Government, and they got there on their own merits. Why do we need separate wards? There are already 13 or more people with Maori heritage in council now being paid fees for advising council, how many do you need?
Western Bay ratepayers, see this for what it is (selfish, in my opinion) and vote against Maori wards. Abridged)
C HUMPHREYS, Katikati

Herald On Sunday 6/5/18 
CLOSING THE SUMMIT
On what legal authority does the unelected Chair, Paul Majurey, and the Maunga Authority representatives have to close the summit of Takarunga/Mt Victoria to vehicles permanently?

Certainly not under the principal Act, The Reserves Act 1977.

I used to enjoy driving on to Devonport Wharf with the family to watch the yachts racing by within metres. This wharf was closed to vehicles on dubious safety grounds when it was quite clearly designed to take a battalion of Sherman tanks.

Sadly another missed opportunity for all to view our beautiful Waitemata Harbour and boats close up. Is it a case of the tail wagging the dog?
BRUCE TUBB, Takapuna

Dominion Post 5/5/18 
LIFE IN NZ
Karl du Fresne raised many salient points about current life in NZ (Backtrack a case of capitalism cowed, May 3).

But I congratulate the Hastings District Council for approving, and the owners of the land for constructing, the access track.

The earthworks have been likened to a scar from open heart surgery, but even a simpleton (am I allowed to use that word?) will know that mother nature, time and some judicious planting will heal that scar.

With regard to iwi concerns, I note that mythology lies at the root of their concern. That is fair enough, there is underlying poetry and artistry in mythology, but should it be allowed to interfere in an owner’s legal use of their land?

As far as I know, it is not a burial ground but if it was, then that would be an entirely different matter.

As some form of way forward, the owner and iwi could discuss some quality signs at various points along the track giving voice to the mythological and historical aspect of the area.

Hopefully this will go some way to appeasing the social media bone carvers, but if that were to happen, could I just suggest that a sign be placed about the myth that New Zealand is a tolerant society with a good-humoured approach to life.
JIM SIMONS, Waikanae Beach

Wanganui Chronicle 5/5/18 
`DICTATORIAL'
Rachel Stewart is using the disturbing tactic of calling people with opposing views "racist".

When this term is used it is inevitably because their argument is weak and politically biased.

The H in Whanganui was instituted against a majority decision. so it was democracy denied in the name of political correctness, with down-on-knee kowtowing to Maori demands.

I thought we were left with the option of inserting it in our organisations at our will.

Why not go the whole hog and just put the F in front of Fonganui. I suspect that her decision as to who is dumb is the pot calling the kettle black — it had all the hallmarks of a dictatorial person.
G R SCOWN Wanganui

Otago Daily Times 5/5/18 
USE OF AOTEAROA
Please inform S. O’Connor (ODT, 3.5.18) that ‘‘Aotearoa’’ is only one of many names for the North Island, so surely no southerner should sponsor it.

Nowhere does it appear in the Treaty of Waitangi.

And very few, if any, Maori used it until political correctness overwhelmed us.
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Weekend Sun / Sunlive 4/5/18 
RACE-BASED WARDS
Racism is differentiation on the basis of race.

Democracy is one man, one vote – the same vote. Maori wards fail both tests.

We do not want a New Zealand form of apartheid. Both sides would be worse off. ‘A house divided against itself will not stand'.
L CHRISTIE, Otumoetai.


LOCAL GOVERNMENT NZ HISSY FITS
This LGNZ outfit is a joke. Currently five of its councils are facing polls on the question of Maori wards. President Cull has written an open letter to Ms Mahuta, Minister of Local Government, whinging about legitimate polls on race-based council Maori ward seats. Well this lot had it coming to them because in most cases elected members had never promoted this aberration on their 2016 electoral platforms.

Once elected, they sought to stick voters with their own-race-based mind-sets and little agendas, usually without consultation. That is not democracy, it's authoritarian behaviour.

Remember a poll is no guarantee the proposal will not succeed so where is the problem? It is simply giving voters a say, not blindsiding them. There's nothing wrong with referendums on all major issues but LGNZ clearly know the public are not with them and there is no place in NZ for race-based politics or special reserved representation based on ethnicity, as promoted by LGNZ. Conclusion reached is that these bigots are poor losers.

As someone opposed to local authority wards per se, I have no problem in extending right to a poll on all ward seats because community boards can address special local issues.
R PATERSON, Matapihi.

Bay of Plenty Times 4/5/18 
NO SEPARATISM
Tommy Wilson’s article (Opinion, April 30) in my view trots out familiar half-truths and insults.

There is, in fact, nothing noble or forward-looking in supporting a separate raciallybased political system for the Western Bay of Plenty.

Dr Martin Luther King, whom Mr Wilson refers to in the apparent belief that Dr King would have supported separate Maori wards, would most certainly have opposed such a separatist system. He repeatedly said he wanted people to be judged not by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.

And frankly, that is the only way forward if we want New Zealand to be a country where all citizens have equal political rights, irrespective of when they or their ancestors came to New Zealand.

To imply that those with a Maori ancestor can’t get elected to local councils on their own merit is patronising to Maori, and is totally contradicted by the fact that almost a quarter of members of Parliament are now Maori, including the leaders and/or deputy-leaders of every party in Parliament, none of whom needed the separatist Maori electorates to get into Parliament.

Let’s treat Maori New Zealanders as adults, in every respect, as able to be elected to local councils as they have proved to be in Parliament. Vote “NO” to separate Maori wards.
DON BRASH Auckland

Hawkes Bay Today 4/5/18 
DISTORTED VIEW OF WARS AND HISTORY INSULT TO NZ FAMILIES
The letter from Jess Mio in Tuesday’s paper cannot go unchallenged.

It was not only a direct insult to the memory of my father and father-in-law who gave five years of their lives to the World War II effort.

Her distorted view of NZ and world history is also an insult to all the families of the hundreds of thousands of Pakeha and Maori families whose whanau suffered the horrors of the two wars and to the memory of those who did not return home. 
How dare she denigrate the memory and honour of my uncle who died in the battle of Monte Cassino and the thousands of other NZers who paid the ultimate sacrifice, so she and her whanau can have the luxury of the freedom of speech, a free education and the right to view her irrational opinions of our history.

If this is what she is teaching, her children, then they will never understand the truth.

I suggest she read the recorded history of New Zealand that is less than 200 years old where she will find that the troops that fought in the battles of Aotearoa and especially in Waikato, were not made up of Australian and NZ troops (Anzacs) but British imperial solders.

I, like so many other NZers, am getting sick and tired of the continual adulterated misinformation about the past by people like Jess in an attempt make all other NZers feel guilty about colonisation.

The benefits, opportunities and progress from colonisation for Maori are never mentioned.

Jess, when you attend next year’s Anzac parade, I suggest you take time to look around you and see the impact that Anzac has had and will always have on all New Zealanders and what it really means to us all, Maori and Pakeha alike. Lest we forget
GORDON ANDERSON, Napier


SIMPLISTIC VIEWS
Jess Mio’s letter questions the selectivity of acknowledging the losses in foreign wars on Anzac Day without reference to the NZ War victims of the mid-later years of the 1800s following the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Her comments on a “treatydishonouring, land-thieving, white supremacist state” are certainly grounded in truth at some level, but the simplistic extremism of this view fails to take into account Pakeha and Maori cultural attitudes in a period of history none of us alive today would be comfortable with on either side of the fence. These wars, with whatever slights, offences, injustices that sparked them, were fought between Maori and Pakeha, with Maori often allied to Pakeha and fighting other Maori in a muddle of alliances.

These were more of a civil war nature, as were the earlier Musket Wars.

The Musket Wars of the earlier 1800s were far worse in butchery than anything that happened in the Land Wars, and those were exclusively Maori wars.

Conservative estimates put Maori deaths at 20,000 plus . . . more deaths than occurred in either World War and the greatest war loss of life in our known history. Another civil war. So who or what we were honouring or betraying under what banner or flag in the 1800s in NZ or Niu Tireni is very confusing. Civil wars where who acknowledges what are like that.
ALAN RHODES, Napier

Dominion Post 4/5/18 
BURNING QUESTION
I just don't get it. TV One's Breakfast show host Jack Tame several days ago asked viewers, "If there is a 'burning question you would like answered please email Breakfast@ tvnz.co.nz."

Tame used the word "burning" several times. So I wrote once about the university-enforced racism of matauranga Maori in university courses. I got no reply or acknowledg-ment.

So I wrote again. Again, silence. Yet strangely Jack Tame then asked viewers, "How do you think we are doing in race relations?"

Is he showing a racist bias here? At least he could have had manners to acknowledge my responses and give me reasons for declining- if that might seem his course. After all, TV One is owned by the government, for the people.
BUD JONES, Wellington

Northland Age 3/5/18 
REVISIONIST ART
The prominent oil painting, View of Mt Egmont, depicting Maori driving off settlers’ cattle, was painted in 1861 by Englishman William Strutt. Kauma¯tua Peter Moeahu said the painting denigrates Ma¯ori and it is racist.

Not all Maori land was stolen, and Maori did commit terrible atrocities, killing settlers and destroying farms and driving their animals off.

Yes, it happened. What next? Wonder what would be said of a painting depicting the Chatham Island shoreline strewn with Moriori, men, women and children with stakes driven through them, dead and dying, or did this not happen now?

Why are these people scared of the truth? Why the need to live a lie?
REX ANDERSON, Lower Hutt


WORKING FOR ALL
Kelvin Davis is a worry. Despite his obviously mixed heritage, he chooses to align himself with only one set of ancestors. A bit like choosing a religion, I guess.

As a government MP, he’s tripping around Northland, announcing that those with Maori ancestry want an equal say with the elected government about how New Zealand is managed (and therefore, how our taxpayer funds are spent).

In Auckland we have a lot of co-governance going on, and so far, there is nothing to recommend it. Sure a few power-hungry types get big salaries and a lot of status, but ‘the people’ get way less than before.

Public spaces are increasingly being closed off with spurious justification; big monies are allocated to help a few, not all the needy; development consents seem to depend on how good you are at (dealing with) the right people; and all the while, our rates/ levies/fees keep going up.

Mr Davis is symbolic of all the advantages that can be gained from living in a Western democracy. Now he wants to destroy it. Let’s put our ancestry aside and start doing what’s right for all people, no matter what ethnicity they align themselves with.
FIONA MACKENZIE, Whangaparaoa


DOWN THE GURGLER
So a Whangarei Maori Immersion School, according to the media reports, is the latest tainted by misspending, unauthorised spending of funds, more usually categorised as theft, misappropriation, theft as a servant, breach of fiduciary duty, nepotism and such like. This involved overpayments, advances to staff, cash payments, cash cheques and credit card abuse.

It’s hardly surprising investigators think payments were ‘eyebrow-raising,’ but this sort of thing is now being treated as the norm, because it happens so often, with no meaningful action being taken against the perpetrators. In other words, the Kiwi public have become desensitised.

The staff/student ration levels and relative payments etc. must have had alarm bells ringing as they did initially in 2010, then again in 2013, yet issues continued unabated until April 2017 (a year ago). Track record indicates students learnt little but kapa haka and other irrelevant mumbo jumbo nonsense. It was a money pit with funds siphoned off.

Government authorities and auditors can plaster up cracks and window-dress as much as they like, maintaining the modern day PC stance that it is entirely possible to pick up a piece of dung by the clean end – well it ain’t so!

How about laying charges and prosecuting the miscreants? Because every time one picks up the paper you read about this never-ending rorting – so stop it dead in its tracks. A good start would be to provide no money, no funding, nothing to these people. The national body representing Maori Immersion Schools (TRN) is opposed to any intervention.

In future they must all pay their own way, because as Kiwi taxpayers, we all have personal grievance claims against the government and rorter, as it is our money that’s going down the gurgler.
ROB PATERSON, Mt Maunganui


UNTIRING ACTIVISM
Most of us live our lives occupied with providing for our families and caring for our friends. We generally just get on with life, and take little notice of political agitators. I’m the kind of bloke who has just assumed that they’d eventually go away.

But I did take some notice back in 1986. The largest petition in our history (800,000-plus signatures) was presented to Parliament in 1985 in the face of proposals to legalise sodomy. The petitioners opposed such a law change. But the Labour government knew better, and acted in defiance of this expression of the overwhelming preference of the population, and legalised sodomy.

The ramifications of that arrogance are now clear to all. Israel Folau is the latest public victim.

In 1987, that same Labour government, again in the face of widespread opposition, forbade corporal punishment in our schools. And in 2007, despite widespread public opposition, another Labour government criminalised corporal discipline by parents.

At the following general election, 85-plus per cent of our voting population voted in a referendum to overturn that criminalisation, but the incoming National government arrogantly dismissed the overwhelming preference of the population. The ramifications of that arrogance, producing an undisciplined generation, are also becoming manifest.

It’s clear now that relentless, untiring activism was the crucial influence on those governments. And we have continued to ignore political activists at our peril.

Your racist columnist, Anahera Herbert-Graves, has waffled on ad nauseam, and we’ve just ignored her. But she and fellow Maori activists have been beavering away in the background, forming strategic alliances with other racist, left-wing groups, and building towards their objectives. In your edition of April 24, Mrs Herbert-Graves smilingly reveals “We’ve gotcha!”

The most influential, formidable and powerful ally of the racist activists has lowered the boom. The United Nations has issued its “observations” on the state of play in New Zealand, has expressed its concerns, and made its recommendations (demands ?) - http:/ /www.converge.org.nz/pma/E-C.12-NZLCO-4-AUV.pdf . In short, the UN expects New Zealand to make all necessary changes/reforms to its laws and regulations so that Maori take control.

You and I would just respond: “Go take a leap!” But remember, we have a Labour-Greens government until late 2020. These pollies will receive such UN “observations” as quite the justification they need to carry out their villainy on a pretext of compliance with United Nations’ direction.

Given our appalling record at the United Nations of voting against Israel and voting in support of “safe” abortions in developing countries, the UN will certainly expect us to comply.

I urge your readers to investigate this UN document, and to alert their MPs that they are watching, even though previous experience indicates that MP’s will take no notice of constituent wishes.
ALAN JONES, Invercargill

Otago Daily Times 3/5/18 
PLENTY OF PLACE NAMES MISPRONOUNCED
I HOPE Dave Ward’s concern for pronouncing place names correctly also extends to all the other foreign place names that are regularly mispronounced by English speakers the world over (ODT, 28.4.18).

When he refers, for example to Paris, Berlin, Vienna or Moscow, does he pronounce these in the fashion of a native speaker of that country? I very much doubt it.

English is full of foreign words and place names, which makes it such a rich and wonderful language.

For generations these words have usually been mispronounced to suit the sound patterns of the speakers of English. This is how the language works and has nothing to do with lack of respect or racism.

It is entirely normal for this to happen in English. If I speak English I would pronounce Maori words and place names in the English fashion. If I speak Maori, of course I would then pronounce them in the correct Maori fashion.

So please, let us not continue down the road of having the language police telling us how to use whichever language we choose to speak.
KEN SPALL, Mosgiel

Nelson Mail 2/5/18 
NO HAPPINESS OR SUSTENANCE
One must feel sorry for those like Gary Clover and Stephen Conn whose letters show they derive neither happiness nor sustenance from their outlooks and even less from what they might look forward to.

Both seem threatened, so fixatedly, by opinions contrary to their own they're compelled to damn outright things that ARE significant and important to others.

The Mail accorded each letter its No 1 letter slot, thus endorsing them regardless of the emptiness they proffered-

Clover's in attempting to justify his group's appalling intolerance and threats of "untoward behaviour" that wrought cancellation of Bruce Moon's Nelson Library lecture; and Conn's, perpetually on his anti-religion bike, in knocking concepts of Heaven and Hell out of rubbishy conjecture that Christian believers "feel superior to non-believers".

In 1985, Geoffrey Palmer formulated an absurdity - "Treaty principles" - and ever since, the Treaty industry, unswervingly and undeservingly, has transmogrified issues that never were issues into the wonkiness of today's PC-actuality.

"Improved race relations" were promised, but the outrageous "settlements" have wrought only the diametric opposite.

Among so many today, Mr Clover's stance is discernible as sanctifying the fact of a government-brewed Hell that even Mr Conn would have to acknowledge.
JIM CABLE Nelson,

Northland Age 1/5/18 
PERFECT PROOF
Well the upcoming Northcote parliamentary byelection has certainly shown one thing conclusively, ie the need (if there ever was one) or claim for Maori roll parliamentary seats has absolutely no validity. Plus, in respect of local councils, there is no justification for preferential Maori ward race-based seats.

Both major parties, National and Labour, have selected candidates in Northcote who claim Maori heritage (no matter infinitesimal) who they must think are capable and competent candidates. It is therefore clear that yet another person with Maori heritage will be the next Northcote MP, making 30 in Parliament.

What this proves is that those who play the Maori race card have as much chance as everyone else in attaining political office at the highest levels in New Zealand.

So let’s not downplay or taint people’s endeavours and aspirations based on merit and assist them to achieve their goals by opposing the race-based philosophy and nonsense that pervades the PC brigade.

This is a self-evident truth wake-up call for Kiwis to once and for all get rid of the separatist Maori roll parliamentary seats and put a stop to all initiatives for race-based Maori wards on local councils, along with any unelected race-based representation.

This preferential treatment is demeaning and reeks of racism, and we all accept that apartheid has no place in New Zealand.
ROB PATERSON, Mt Maunganui

Bay of Plenty Times 1/5/18 
PALE, STALE MALE IS SNIDE TERMINOLOGY
It is a bit sad that Tommy Wilson, who did seem, at one time, to be more objective than some, has now reverted to the snide terminology that is so popular with the infallible left.

He, being a competent researcher, might have noticed that the entire infrastructure that we enjoy today was put in place by none other than that same “pale, male and stale” demographic that he describes — nobody else.
GRAHAM STEENSON, Whakatane

Otago Daily Times 1/5/18 
CHANGING OTAGO TO OTAKOU WOULD BE WRONG
THE suggestion that the title of our noble province be altered to Otakou (ODT, 27.4.18) is unwarranted.

Otakou was the Maori name for the kaika at the entrance to the harbour, the correct pronunciation of which is Otago.

Rather than Otago being the anglicised form of Otakou, it is the incorrect spelling of the original Maori word which is responsible for the confusion.

A fuller explanation can be found in Maori Dunedin, by Goodall and Griffiths, on pages 46 to 48.

In 1848, the New Zealand Association, located in Scotland, accepted Otago as being correct and informed their Dunedin representative, Captain Cargill, of their decision.

That Otago was to be the official name of the settlement was subsequently published in the Otago News. Both of these publications are available at the Hocken Library, Dunedin.

Undoubtedly, there are others who are more qualified than myself to comment on this subject. Hopefully they will put pen to paper.
FRANK G. LECKIE, Burkes


PETER Small (ODT, 27.4.18) is incorrect in his belief that Otago is simply the anglicised form of Otakou — it is the southern or Kai Tahu Maori dialect of the name, in exactly the same way that Waihola is a southern form of Waihora and Rakiura is a southern form of Rangiora.

The southern dialect had fallen largely out of use until recently and is only now undergoing a slight revival, with some Dunedin organisations preferring to use the southern form in their Maori names.

A prime example would be the Hocken Collections, which describe themselves as Te Uare Taoka o Hakena, rather than the ‘‘standard’’ Maori Whare Taonga o Hakena.
JAMES DIGNAN, St Clair


PETER Small (ODT, 27.4.18) claims Otago is just an anglicised form of Otakou. Not so.
The name Otago is an old southern Maori dialect word (see Peter Entwisle, Behold the Moon, 1998, pp 136139). Otakou is a North Island ‘‘corruption’’.

I’ve been surprised how many lifelong Dunedin locals don’t know this. Let’s keep the name of our region.
COLIN CHEYNE, Dunedin

Dominion Post 30/4/18 
WELLINGTON'S GOT IT LUCKY
You are lucky if you live in Wellington, because the name is so easy to say correctly.

Here in Honor fin oouh, we are "looked at" if we say it correctly; "Hoar roar fen ooah".

The voice-over professional who refused to advertise Waimate the "white way" has made headlines. So did the young Kapiti man who tried to influence local Maori language usage some time ago.

Nothing much seems to change, but some will hope Wellington stays with its current name and not the pre-Treaty Maori version, Te Whanganui-a-Tara. And what about Poneke, eh?
MICHAEL DAILY, Levin

Wanganui Chronicle 28/4/18 
RACIAL PROFILING
Successful film director Taika Waititi says New Zealand is racist as, but his take is not my take.

If you group people by race, then any discussion of another race can be called racist and also profiling.

People seem to think profiling is wrong, but it is an instinct important to survival - like fight or flight - developed for very good reasons.

If someone walks into a dairy they are profiled. We profile people of our own race and different races everyday, some we recognise as we would like to know them and some we know we should steer clear of - we can't control our instincts.

What I do notice that has crept into pakeha circles are grievance building discussions as Maori have become more demanding of a special place in our society to be occupied just by them with powers denied the rest of us. But discussions stop if a Maori enters the circle, and I believe there are discussions within Maori that stop if pakeha enter the circle.
G R SCOWN, Whanganui

Bay of Plenty Times 28/4/18 
WARDS NOT EQUAL
Many good people have stood for councils and not made it, women included, and we are 52 per cent of the population.

I know every man and woman of any ethnicity is my equal, and I know that if we have a Maori ward it is telling Maori they are not good enough and not electable.

This is a nonsense as we have had Maori representatives in the past and we will again in the future. Just as we have had more really capable women on Western Bay and at the moment we only have one. So, it is a dreadful lie to pretend that Maori are not good enough.

There is good consultation with Maori now, in addition to the consultation with the whole community. Imagine locking Maori voters into one ward stretching over the extraordinarily vast distances and stopping them from voting for other councillor positions.

There are four councillors representing the Kaimai Ward, three representing Katikati/Waihi Beach Ward, and four representing Te Puke/Maketu. No way should the system be designed to keep Maori out and separate. We are all New Zealanders and equal.
MARGARET MURRAY-BENGE, Bethlehem
 
Wanganui Chronicle 28/4/18 
RACISM
One has to admire the manoeuvrings of the Maori Renaissance Movement. While crying "racism" on one hand, they are busy cementing in place undeniably separatist privileges on the other.

Examples include public funding for Maori-only initiatives such as education/scholarships, housing projects, health and welfare facilities, prisoner programmes, positions on government agencies, Resource Management Act consultation rights. co-management of parks/rivers/lakes and the coastline, te reo promotion, radio and TV channels, appointments on to local government committees/statutory boards, seats in Parliament, tribal charitable status and a special Maori authority tax rate of 17.5 per cent.

We are funding lawyers for about 580 overlapping tribal claims to our coastline and a local government push to entrench Maori seats on all councils.

It's laughable when the compliant media promote grandstanding comments from people like Taika Waititi, Susan Devoy and Lizzie Marvelly, who scream racism while embracing "separatism with privileges" as listed above.

New Zealand is fundamentally a healthy, multicultural society but it will only be at peace when all mention of race is taken out of legislation.
GEOFF PARKER, Whangarei

The Press 28/4/18 
NGAI TAHU NOT BEST GUARDIAN
Andrea Ramsell suggests Maori would be better guardians of our waterways than, presumably, anyone else (Letters, April 23).

This is not necessarily always the case. Maori farming interests can also pose a threat to waterways. For example, 6700 hectares of forest at Eyrewell were cleared by Ngai Tahu for intensive dairy operations in an area already suffering badly from water degradation. They also removed hundreds of thousands of trees from the Balmoral forest for irrigated dairy conversion on more than 9000ha right beside the Hurunui River! The Environment Court and ECan placed significant restrictions on the project, which currently grazes beef, but land clearing continues and Ngai Tahu are unlikely to give up on it.

The true guardians of our rivers and streams are organisations like Fish and Game, Forest & Bird and local action groups.
CRAIG MINEHAN, Lyttelton

Weekend Sun / Sunlive 27/4/18 
MAORI WARDS UNDERMINING DEMOCRACY
The NZ Centre for Political Research reveals Stuart Crosby, Doug Leeder and 13 other local body politicians voted to undermine our democracy!

This group, The National Council for Local Government NZ, voted for and sent the following resolution to parliament. “That the ability to demand a poll to overturn a council decision to create a Maori ward or constituency is anomalous and discriminatory and should be removed.”

These people, who are paid large amounts by you and I, obviously have no idea of their duty to promote democratic policy, as demanded by the communities to which they are the servants.

I believe Crosby and Leeder should be removed from office. We are sick and tired of people trying to create separatism in New Zealand. (Abridged).
K. EVANS, Tauranga


DRAWING THE LINE AT PALE AND MALE
If G Hodgson (The Weekend Sun, April 20) wishes to criticise the local council for being unoriginal, stagnant and out of touch, or ‘stale', to use their word, I have no problem. These are clearly undesirable characteristics.

However, things become problematic for me once the words ‘pale' and ‘male' are thrown into the mix; as though being a man and having European ancestry are similarly negative traits.

Although identity politics may be en vogue these days, voting for or against people based on gender and ethnicity meets the dictionary definitions of both sexism and racism. I shall be voting based on the merits of the individual candidates, not their skin colour or gender.
C LAWSON, Ohauiti.


LEST WE FORGET THEM ALL
Each year Anzac Day rightly reminds us of the sacrifice soldiers made, and of the senseless waste of life and futility of war.

Yet one must ask why there is no commemoration reminding us to weep for those who fell in the country's darkest days when Maori slaughtered the peaceful Patupaiarehe, the Turehu, Moriori, and the now extinct Ngati Kapupungapunga. The latter being people who occupied the Waikato before Tainui Maori swept them from the land.

Why are there no monuments to this incredible tragedy? Why is the massacre of this country's first settlers all but absent from our popular and accepted history books?

Arguably 100,000 descendants of the earliest settlers lost their lives in the bloody conquests that followed – many times more than the 18,000 New Zealanders who perished in WWI or the 12,000 who died in WWII.

Why won't New Zealand's politicians and academics recognise and honour the original inhabitants of New Zealand as they honour those that perished in two world wars? They must learn the truth from Pope Francis when he said, “Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it”.
I BROUGHAM, Wanganui.

Dominion Post 27/4/18 
OUTRAGE MISPLACED
Re Kaumatua disgusted at gallery's of to show colonial painting (Stuff, April23), perhaps Peter Moeahu should look a little closer to home before getting all excited about an 1861 painting which he thinks is "racist" because it depicts Maori as "thieves and robbers" by apparently driving off cattle.

He feels insulted, but his outrage is misplaced and should be seen in the light of inscriptions on tombstones in the churchyard of St Mary's, New Plymouth.

Thereupon are recorded, between 1860 and 1863, deaths of soldiers and settlers with, on some memorials, the telling words: "Murdered by rebel Maori", "Killed by hostile Maori", "Dangerously wounded by Maori".

Whatever Moeahu thinks, he cannot ignore the fact that his ancestors were not blameless in any way during the so-called "Taranaki War".

He cannot turn back or rewrite history nor turn his anger into censorship.

Both sides in those skirmishes no doubt have perpetrated and experienced outrages and the Govett-Brewster gallery needs to get a grip and ignore this one-sided nonsense, or give equal showing to artwork depicting what Maori see as their view of history.
ALLEN HEATH, Woburn


COUNCIL REMISS
Working people look to Our Wellington booklet to keep somewhat informed of important matters. Big mistake.

Omitted from December and April issues was Mayor Justin Lester's initiative to make Wellington a Maori Language City.

I was informed by the discovery of a tiny undated yellow notice written primarily in Maori. The council advised this was half of the notice it handed out on Waitangi Day. What says the other half I wonder. Was that dated?

Submissions have closed, with some residents speaking at a council strategy meeting on May 3.

Why did the council choose not to include this significant matter in a publication distributed to all households? December was too early and April too late, I was told. I say better late than never, and request inclusion in the next edition.

Separating who hears what is a divisive act. Try transparency. The council's proposals beg the question as to why Wellington. Hawke's Bay, where large numbers of Maori live, maybe.

What's the driver here - ambition? Is our mayor serving self or serving all? I wonder, given the deterioration of many things council related.

Good people make all people matter. "We are now One New Zealand" is an ethos whose time has come.
CAROL OLIVER, Wadestown

Taranaki Daily News 27/4/18 
HISTORY MOVES ON
Should I start frothing at the mouth or go into violent convulsions whenever I see or hear any mention of the Bayeux Tapestry? This blatantly racist piece of work, commissioned by William the Conquerer sometime after 1066, depicts the lead up to the Battle of Hastings, and the subsequent overthrow and demise of Anglo-Saxon domination of England by the Norman invaders. My ancestors were destined to become slaves in their own country for the next few hundred years. Never mind that that we had done exactly the same to the original British inhabitants some five hundred years earlier after the Roman departure.

Should Vermeer's depictions of the Milkmaid and Girl with a Pearl Earring be regarded as sexist? Michaelangelo's works in the Sistine chapel, along with his rendition of the Last Supper, could both arouse controversy from people of different races and religious persuasions. Does its social comment still have the same impact today? I doubt it.

History (and art) moves on. Get over it.
CHRIS TOMPKINS Bell Block


MOEAHU PATRONISING
I readily accept Mr Moeahu's opinion that William Strutt's View of Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand is (merely) a personal, imaginative, British view of cultural life in New Zealand/ Aotearoa in 1861. I am not sure what he expected artist Strutt's view to have been, other than that.

But that issue is minor. What concerns me more is that Mr Moeahu believes, if not states, that Maori will find any exhibition of the painting unacceptable and that non-Maori New Zealanders will have any "racist" biases they may harbour confirmed, if not ignited, by it.

Mr Moeahu's patronising and paternalistic view of Maori and Pakeha, that they don't "get" what (Western) historical art is about and need to be protected from it, is unfortunate, and unexpected in one serving in an important advisory role to the Govett-Brewster.
DR JOHN POWELL New Plymouth

Northern Advocate 26/4/18 
RACIAL POLITICS
Kelvin Davis is a worry. Despite his obviously mixed heritage, he chooses to align himself with only one set of ancestors. A bit like choosing a religion, I guess.

As a Government MP, he’s tripping around Northland announcing that those with Maori ancestry want an equal say with the elected Government about how New Zealand is managed (and therefore, how our taxpayer funds are spent).

In Auckland, we have a lot of co-governance going on and, so far, there is nothing to recommend it. Sure a few powerhungry types get big salaries and a lot of status, but “the people” get way less than before. Public spaces are increasingly being closed off with spurious j ustification; big monies are allocated to help a few, not all the needy; development consents seem to depend on how good you are at bribing the right people; and all the while, our rates/levies/fees keep going up.

Mr Davis is symbolic of all the advantages that can be gained from living in a Western democracy. Now he wants to destroy it.

Let’s put our ancestry aside and start doing what’s right for all people, no matter what ethnicity they align themselves with.
FIONA MACKENZIE Whangaparaoa

Dominion Post 26/4/18 
MAYOR TURNED SOCIAL ENGINEER
Wellington Mayor Justin Lester, declaring he will make a stronger case for Maori street names, said, ‘‘It’s a democracy and I don’t expect to win everything’’ (April 25).

Nevertheless, he signalled his strong disinclination to lose the naming battle, noting that, since the council launched its policy to make Wellington New Zealand’s Te Reo Maori capital, ‘‘we had more than 250 responses from the community and 95 per cent were positive. They want to have Maori names and I’m trying to respect that.’’

According to his council’s website, 203,800 people live in Wellington city, 73 per cent of them European, 15 per cent Asian and 8 per cent Maori. The clamour for change, which the mayor intends to respect – if clamour is the right word – comes from a formidable 0.1 per cent of the total.

About a quarter of the population speak a language other than English. The most common languages after English are French (5622), then Maori (4536, or 2 per cent of the city’s population).

A challenge for a seriously democratic mayor is to gauge the extent to which indifference explains the overwhelming percentage of non-responses to his social engineering.

If he gets it wrong, he will get a better measure of dissatisfaction levels at the next local body elections.
ROBERT YATES, Porirua


THERE’S NO ‘BUT’
There has recently been expressed every opinion on the matter of freedom of speech, but most are flawed. Those who espouse the right to freedom of speech then add the ‘‘but’’ word have got it wrong.

There is no ‘‘but’’. There can be no condition put on freedom of speech. Freedom of speech is an entity that exists in its own pure form. It cannot be checked by any conditions. There is no responsibility attached to the free speaker. There can be no rules.
Freedom of speech is freedom of speech. You either have freedom of speech or you do not. It is that simple.
DUNCAN McKEE Hataitai

Nelson Mail 25/4/18 
TREATY TALK
Historian Bruce Moon, retired Canterbury University professorial board member, has been a rocket scientist in the UK and Australia.

A fellow of the UK Institute of Physics, director of the Canterbury University Computer Centre; a national President of the NZ computer Society; an Honorary Fellow of the New Zealand Institute Information Technology Professionals and an officer in the Naval Reserve, VRD, his research into NZ History has given us "Real Treaty; False Treaty - The True Waitangi Story".

However, his scheduled talk at the invitation of the Nelson Institute was cancelled, because some apparently highly manipulative individuals successfully pressured members of the Nelson Institute, the Nelson City Council and library staff - who, in the view of no doubt many fair-minded Nelsonians - shamefully cancelled his address.

You then published an article where prominent local part-Maori activist John Mitchell, to his credit, agreed this was "an abrogation of our democracy".

However, he should take on board the fact that although Moon’s impressive body of writing on treaty issues may not please local iwi, far from being "jaundiced", it is very well substantiated, and would very probably be supported by the majority of New Zealanders today, questioning the whole treaty industry.
AMY BROOKE, Hira

Taranaki Daily News 25/4/18 
RACISM?
Hot on the heels of Taiki Waititi's exposure of New Zealand as a land steeped in mispronunciation, here comes Peter Moeahu, apparently determined to leave no stern intoned in rooting out colonial racism.

He opposes the planned New Plymouth display of an 1861 painting of "Mt Egmont ... with Maoris driving off settlers' cattle" because the implied theft denigrates Maori.

On this basis of historical revisionism, it would be hard to find a painting from any century, anywhere in the world, that could not, with a little effort and imagination — and need for publicity — be interpreted as being unfair to somebody.

Burn them all! The books too. That'll fix it.

If this level of spanner-throwing, at an art gallery hui, is a window on local government involvement, heaven help us.
CHRIS LONSDALE New Plymouth

Wanganui Chronicle 24/4/18 
IWI CLAIMS
From what the Attorney General is saying about overlapping iwi claims, it would seem that there are little or no exclusive rights to any area of the coast, yet the process is still proceeding, and — even worse — the iwi and their lawyers are being funded with hundreds of thousands of taxpayers' money, while those opposing the claims have to find their own funding.

If you write to Andrew Little, you receive a letter that basically says he is going to let things proceed. What's happened to justice and the rule of law guaranteed to all New Zealanders?
TERRY O'CONNOR Wanganui

Northland Age 24/4/18 
COMING HOME TO ROOST
The 2017 pre-election assessments about Jazindarilla effectively outlining that she had never held a proper real world job, has always been in politics, fraternising with left wing politicians, have proved to be quite accurate. These outcomes have reinforced the credo of socialism (the philosophy of failure, ignorance and envy), that it promotes the equal sharing of miseries.

At the first hurdles Ms Ardern has baulked, proving to be hopeless, inept and ineffective. The recent Labour Youth Camp “need to know” fiasco showed up the flaws in the Labour hierarchy makeup.

In addition we have had the following debacles:
The appalling race-based reports from ‘basket case’ South Africa last month, confirming white farmers and the new constitution are being severely dealt to by the racist ANC government. The PC response from a politely (in)correct Labour/Greens/ NZF Government and most other New Zealand politicians is that we as Kiwis don’t want to know about racism elsewhere, apparently because this doesn’t suit our prejudiced agendas and flawed ideology, so let’s brush it under the carpet and get on with our own perverse apartheid policy in Kiwiland, promoting race-based separatism.

Greenie Julie Anne Genter, an American with dual citizenship, the Greens’ Minister for Women (the term itself is sexist — and pray tell where is the Minster for Men?), a self-proclaimed fulltime feminist, looks around for an easy mark to pillorise and comes up with the hoary chestnut about old white men in their 60s sitting as directors on public company boards — perhaps they are there on ability, because they are competent and know their stuff, otherwise shareholders would ditch them.

Ms Genter’s qualifications to make this assessment are a BA in philosophy, some French political studies, and AU transportation/parking stuff, hardly mind-blowing credentials.

Her remarks were at best condescending, and fell into the category of ageist, sexist and racist comments. Predictably, she has been reported to the Human Rights Commission, but they are unlikely to address this as their own PC rules never apply to themselves or feminists.

Again Ms Ardern did nothing about this nonsense. Gender inequality whinging indeed, because who is our Prime Minister (Ardern), our Chief Justice (Elias), our Governor-General (Reddy) and our Race Relations Commissioner (Devoy?) Go figure that lot out. Then up to the plate steps Clare Curran, Minister for Broadcasting, organising a clandestine meeting with Carol Hirschfeld, a RNZ senior manager, initially flying under the radar until Ms Hirschfeld finally fesses up while Ms Curran ducks for cover and tries to gobbledegook her way out of the mire.

This all looks like a clear breach of Cabinet manual rules (Section 414), yet again Ms Ardern does nothing, striving to defend the indefensible. All this when Ms Curran’s feet should not have touched the floor on the way out the Cabinet room door. Clark and Key would never have tolerated this behaviour.

These are but some recent examples that reinforce Ms Ardern’s feminist, socialist, leftist mindsets, plus most other fashionable PC nonsense. She looks illequipped to govern as Prime Minister, and her demeanour and truculence leave plenty to be desired.

All the individuals named have one thing in common — guess what that is? The solution for Ms Ardern is if the kitchen is too hot to handle then she should get out now.

Kiwis must seriously ask themselves, is this the decisive, transparent, accountable, honest and open coalition government they wanted and need to have?

In addition, we now have looming large the unwarranted proposed increase in fuel tax, destined methinks mainly for topping up the slush funds, along with many other pending new tax aberrations.
ROB PATERSON, Mt Maunganui


SCIENCE AND CULTURE 
Anne Salmond (NZ Herald, April 21) displays her ignorance of science, which transcends all cultures and nationalities.

Modern science just happened to be born in Western Europe.

Hitler and Stalin tried to establish 'German' and 'Soviet' science, and both failed.

Chinese science was solely empirical, and came to a dead end.

I myself have taught modern physics to Tibetans at the Institute of Buddhist Dialectics in Dharamsala, India, because the Dalai Lama recognised that classic Tibetan culture was deficient in that respect, albeit offering profound insights on other aspects of being human.

No reputable scientist claims that any culture "has a monopoly on human wisdom," of which modern science is but one vital part.

And "complementarity," not Anne's "complimentary," is not exclusive to quantum physics.

The wave and particle properties of light provide another example. Bohr's "tai chi" symbol was neat but not science.

The Royal Society of New Zealand has lost its way, bogged down in the morass of political correctness.
BRUCE MOON Fellow, Institute of Physics (UK) Honorary Fellow, Information Technology Professionals (NZ) Nelson 
  
NZ Herald 23/4/18 
CONSENSUS VIEWS
The letter from Anne Salmond exemplifies the problem the Royal Society of New Zealand has got itself into by trying to represent science and the humanities. They are like chalk and cheese.

Natural science is culture free because the laws of nature are the same in all countries. Beliefs do not change natural laws. Scientific investigations reveal them and scientific beliefs change as the progress of science reveals new evidence. Free speech and open debate are essential.

Humanities study infinitely variable people and their interactions with each other. There are no immutable laws. Some will argue for free speech and others against it because it might offend someone. Consensus largely replaces evidence.

The society has produced a draft code of ethics that suppresses open debate by requiring all members to take note of consensus views, cultural sensitivities and the Treaty of Waitangi. Much of it is ambiguous and unenforceable.

The society has three options: abandon the new code; introduce different codes of ethics for science and for the humanities or abandon science and support a new organisation that can properly represent scientists.
BRYAN LEYLAND, DistFEngNZ, MRSNZ, Pt Chevalier.

Wanganui Chronicle 23/4/18 
THERE FOR ALL
I'm replying to R Pearson (letter April 16) about the river —water — and the mountains also. They don't belong to anyone, in fact they are there for all to enjoy.None of us has any rights over water or any rivers. So, Potonga Neilson, this is fact, and I agree with R Pearson
J.M.J.MORRIS Wanganui

The Press 23/4/18 
NGAI TAHU DIRECTION CHANGE?
I read with interest that Ngai Tahu is proposing to build a 150ha lake on its land (once Belmoral Forest) to help with the Hurunui Water Project (The Press, April 12). Water presumably will be diverted from the Hurunui River into this lake for farmland irrigation.

In 2008, Ngai Tahu was an active member of the group striving for a conservation order over the river. Unfortunately this did not succeed. Ngai Tahu was vocal on how strongly it related to the river and emphasised the importance to its people of uninterrupted passage of its water from source to sea. The concept of ki uta ki tai was mentioned frequently. It would seem from this article that Ngai Tahu now has a different philosophy towards this magnificent river.

Could you invite someone from Ngai Tahu to speak to the people of Canterbury about this change in attitude to the Hurunui river.
DAVE LAURIE, Cashmere

Sunday Star Times 22/1/18 
HAKA EVERYWHERE
I’m 72. When I was at primary school we were taught that Maori were a proud culture and should be respected as such. I was also taught that the haka was performed before battle.

If that’s the case, why don’t Maori acknowledge it as such?

Now we have haka at funerals, gay marriages, for world leaders and returning sports teams.

It seems that whenever there is a camera around, up pops a haka. It’s now cringeworthy to many people.

I’ve got my fingers crossed the haka won’t turn up at the forthcoming royal wedding.
KIT SUTHERLAND, Queenstown

Northern Advocate 20/4/18 
TREATY BURDEN
The nation will be mighty relieved when the last of the Treaty settlements are finalised.

Last year saw Ngai Tahu receive a top-up of $180,000,000 and so far this year a further $18,700,000.

In the same timeframe, Tainui received $170,000,000 and this year $16,600,000.

The payment of these settlements has mainly fallen on the so-called, lucky baby boomers.

That is a huge burden for one generation, and those are the same people now, needing re-placement knees, hips, etc, and the health system is unable to meet their needs in a timely fashion, and their grand-children have need of greater investment in their education.

The government of the time, who agreed to the "top-ups", has done a great disservice to our health and education sectors. Justice is not being fairly served.
ROBIN LIEFFERING Onerahi

Northland Age 19/4/18 
ROLLING ON
Two iwi will receive substantial payments from the Crown as part of their ongoing Treaty of Waitangi settlements payments, $16.6 million to Waikato Tainui and $18.7 million to Ngai Tahu.

Both iwi can make a request for more payment every five years. This can go on for another 10 years, to ensure the real value of their settlements remains at 17 per cent to Tainui and 16.1 per cent Ngai Tahu of the total.

Ngai Tahu had sold all the land they occupied in Australia before the treaty was signed.

The weak government of the day returned it to them for nothing.

Tainui wanted to drive the white people back into the sea. I bet today’s Maori are pleased they didn’t.

Ngai Tahu’s main business before 1998 was claiming money from the government, and through this lucrative endeavour managed to benefit from already five full and final settlements.

This tribe also made money out of selling the South Island before 1840, and then selling it all over again to the New Zealand government after 1840.

Eighty per cent of Ngai Tahu’s profit — more than $129 million — is tax-free income.
IAN BROUGHAM Wanganui

Bay of Plenty Times 19/4/18 
UNFAIR SITUATION
What is fairness? Peter Dey indicates that there should be special Maori wards to give Maori voters a chance to elect Maori councillors (Letters, April 2). As he claims to campaign for fairness, I would be grateful if he would please explain how an experience my late wife and I had in 1982 was fair and non-racist.

As a state employee, I managed to gain a modest loan with a mortgage through a government agency to renovate a second-hand house we had bought and moved on to our land with the objective of making it our future home. The interest rate we had to pay was 6.5 per cent.

Shortly afterwards, I understand an acquaintance of Maori descent was able to gain a much larger loan with a mortgage through the Department of Maori Affairs to set up and develop a kiwifruit orchard at only 3.5 per cent interest. He had a larger invoice than I did too. To me, this situation didn't seem fair, so I would appreciate Peter explaining how it was fair?
WILL GOLDSMITH, Pyes Pa

Gisborne Herald 18/4/18 
LET’S DROP THE PERSONAL ATTACKS
Is there a culture within council and its cohorts of bullying and denigration by personal attacks on those of the public willing to question the direction council may be taking with public spending?

We have had the ex-CEO resort to attacking “old, white males” who may have expressed an opposing opinion, and now we have a councillor attacking a constituent over his differing opinion of the parking space for boat trailers at the wharf.

We have also seen the demise of Mike Mulrooney’s contributions (I enjoyed his interactive debates and expression of opinion, not that I always agreed), and someone called me a whining communist for pointing out an issue around road tax on e-cars.

There is an obvious desire to shut down the dissenting voice by attacking the individual, and this surely represents a powerful move to extinguish free speech within our society.

Councillors are elected to represent the constituents who placed them into their position and not to push their own selfish direction without total justification and fully explaining their direction to all public — nor resort to personal attacks on the said public.

Good debate is a healthy part of society, so let’s drop the personal attacks and discuss the points at issue.
W. BROWN

Daily Post Rotorua 18/4/18
MAORI MOVES
One has to admire the shrewd manoeuvrings of the Maori Renaissance Movement. While crying "racism" on one hand, they are busy cementing in place undeniably separatist privileges on the other.

Examples include public funding for Maori-only initiatives, such as education/ scholarships, housing projects, health and welfare facilities, prisoner programmes, positions on government agencies, Resource Management Act consultation rights, co-management of parksiriverS/ lakes and the coastline, to reo promotion, radio and TV channels, appointments on to local government committees/statutory boards, seats in Parliament, tribal charitable status despite all beneficiaries being related, and a special Maori Authority tax rate of 17.5 per cent .
But wait, there's more to come. We're currently funding lawyers for about 580 overlapping, tribal claims to our coastline and a local government push to entrench Maori seats on all councils.

It's laughable when the compliant media promote grandstanding comments from people like Taika Waititi, Susan Devoy and Lizzie Marvelly, who scream racism while embracing "separatism with privileges" as listed above.
New Zealand is fundamentally a healthy, multicultural society which is being totally undermined by the greed of politically powerful separatists. It will only be at peace when all mention of race is taken out of legislation.
GEOFF PARKER Whangarei

Dominion Post 17/4/18 
FREEDOMS INFRINGED
The editorial in Saturday's Dominion Post was subtle to the point of opacity (Trouble with the truth).

It was interesting that you used the examples of two sportspeople having their right to free speech abridged because they didn't adhere to the new orthodoxy.

You could have equally used the example of your columnist, Bob Brockie, who has been castigated by the "huddle of malevolence" for daring to suggest that the Royal Society has no business elevating stone-age "wisdom" to the same level as science.

Or perhaps you could have used another of your columnists, Karl Du Fresne, as an example. After all, his robust defence of freedom of speech was shouted down because he had the temerity to take on the illiberality of the Left and its "redistribution of opinion", also known as the war on free thought and speech.

You are right to fear the people you describe at the end of your editorial. They aren't narrowing the values of the Enlightenment, they are destroying them. This is dangerous.

But you don't need to look for them in the unlit areas of the cyber highway. You'll find them in your newsroom and at the university.
RON SHAW Carterton

Northland Age 17/4/18 
DOUBLE STANDARDS
One has to admire the shrewd manoeuvrings of the Maori renaissance movement. 
While crying ‘racism’ on one hand, they are busy cementing in place undeniably separatist privileges on the other.

Examples include public funding for Maori-only initiatives, such as education/scholarships, housing projects, health and welfare facilities, prisoner programmes, positions on government agencies, Resource Management Act consultation rights, comanagement of parks/rivers/lakes and the coastline, te reo promotion, radio and TV channels, appointments on to local government committees/statutory boards, seats in Parliament, tribal charitable status despite all beneficiaries being related, and a special Maori authority tax rate of 17.5 per cent.

But wait, there’s more to come. We’re currently funding lawyers for approximately 580 overlapping tribal claims to our coastline, and a local government push to entrench Maori seats on all councils.

It’s laughable when the compliant media promote grandstanding comments from people like Taika Waititi, Susan Devoy and Lizzie Marvelly, who scream racism while embracing “separatism with privileges,” as listed above.

New Zealand is fundamentally a healthy, multicultural society, which is being totally undermined by the greed of politically powerful separatists. It will only be at peace when all mention of race is taken out of legislation.
GEOFF PARKER Kamo


UNLAMENTED
It is no surprise to find John Hatfield using your indulgent letters section to praise the late unlamented Winnie Mandela, vicious Communist terrorist.

In so doing, he quotes Charlene Smith, South African journalist, as saying: “South Africa today has one of the worst crime rates in the world…. apartheid’s legacy”.

Mrs Smith is acknowledging that, after the removal of the anti-Communist Afrikaans government, the subsequent Communist government of South Africa has brought complete disaster, economically and socially. But rather than lay the blame and the responsibility where it belongs, she wants to continue to blame the Afrikaaners, whose government was marked by a low crime rate.

This suits Mr Hatfield, who continues to blame appalling part-Maori crime on European settlers.

Anyone wanting to know the horrific reality of South Africa today needs only to do an internet search for Lauren Southern.

You have to do that, because our main-stream media decline to report on it.
LEO LEITCH Benneydale


NOT SO, HONE
Hone Harawira writes on Winnie Mandela accurately. A woman of her times, heavily involved in the tragic history of South Africa. Since Black rule the situation has worsened, as the nation becomes an ever increasing basket case.

One thing Hone got wrong (perhaps on purpose) was that Jesus Christ got it wrong. Many Jewish people got it wrong, not believing Christ was exactly who He said He was, overcoming death, and they still haven’t got the message. We will all know the facts in time.

We are all mongrels, a mix of many bloods, Maori, Pakeha or whatever. New Zealand is becoming a real mixture of many races and cultures. Some Kiwis are shamefully forced by many circumstances to live in poverty. Others super rich and becoming richer by the hour. A bit like South Africa was, and look what happened there!

Christ didn’t get it wrong, His teachings are mankind’s only hope.
SAM MCHARG, Kerikeri

Bay of Plenty Times 17/4/18 
SYSTEM MATTERS
I disagree with Peter Dey, who states the election system is biased in favour of Pakeha candidates (Letters, April 9). His rationale is based upon there being no Maori councillors on the Western Bay Council. My differing opinion is based on my experience of local body elections that used the Single Transferable Vote (STV) system rather than First Past the Post (FPP).

I previously voted in an election that returned the country’s youngest mayor, the country’s youngest and eldest councillors, an approximate 50:50 mix of male and female councillors, three councillors with Maori heritage and two councillors with Pasifika heritage.

It reflected the community that it served. Good-quality candidates from all demographics in the community were prepared to stand and the incumbent councillors voted to use STV. Preceding the election, the local body encouraged candidates from all demographics to stand for election. Unfortunately, the Western Bay District Council recently decided to continue with FPP rather than adopting the STV system, which could have brought about a more representative range of councillors, and decided that the introduction of Maori wards was a better option.

There are many who would disagree with both decisions and, sadly, we may end up at the next election with much of the same. (Abridged)
DAVID ROLFE, Omokoroa

Wanganui Chronicle 16/4/18 
FACTS AND RACISM
When did facts written by well-educated people who were there at the time become racist?

Potonga Neilson's denials of the truth are an embarrassment.

Just look at what's happening to Sir Bob Jones — 60,000 brainwashed children want his knighthood taken away for making a statement based on fact. Everyone has colonial ancestors.

"I am the river" — no, you're not. Rainwater runs downhill and always will — it was there long before we turned up, it will be there long after we are gone, no matter what childish fairytales you make up about things.
R PEARSON Feilding

Nelson Mail 16/4/18 
COUNCIL DECISIONS
Traditionally, residents and ratepayers could challenge council decisions. Through Section 19ZB of the Local Electoral Act 2001, they could mount a petition. If 5 percent of voters signed that petition, they could demand a referendum, and the voters could decide the outcome.

This is a check and balance measure to ensure councillors are representing their constituency honourably and accurately.

The mayor of Dunedin wrote an open letter to Ardern's coalition government calling for the removal of petition rights of citizens where their councils unilaterally decided to establish Maori wards.

This is the beginning of the breakdown of democratic representation on the local level.

Our mayors, Ms. Reece and Mr. Kempthorne, signed their agreement to this proposal.

I guess they don't want lowly citizens interfering with righteous decisions, no matter how bad they are.
JOYCE ROBINSON Wakefield,

Northern Advocate 16/4/18 
MAORI MOVES
One has to admire the shrewd manoeuvrings of the Maori Renaissance Movement. 
While crying “racism” on one hand, they are busy cementing in place undeniably separatist privileges on the other.

Examples include public funding f or Maori-only initiatives, such as education/ scholarships, housing projects, health and welfare facilities, prisoner programmes, positions on government agencies, Resource Management Act consultation rights, co-management of parks/rivers/ lakes and the coastline, te reo promotion, radio and TV channels, appointments on to local government committees/statutory boards, seats in Parliament, tribal charitable status despite all beneficiaries being related, and a special Maori Authority tax rate of 17.5 per cent.

But wait, there’s more to come. We’re funding lawyers for approximately 580 overlapping, tribal claims to our coastline and a local government push to entrench Maori seats on all councils.

It’s laughable when the compliant media promote grandstanding comments from people like Taika Waititi, Susan Devoy and Lizzie Marvelly, who scream racism while embracing “separatism with privileges” as listed above.

New Zealand is fundamentally a healthy, multicultural society which is being totally undermined by the greed of politically powerful separatists. It will only be at peace when all mention of race is taken out of legislation.
GEOFF PARKER Kamo

Waikato Times 16/4/18 
REFERENDUM CALL
Once again racism has raised its head in NZ. By using public apathy some councils have installed seats of race. When some councils used democracy through a referendum to see if representatives based on race were wanted, a clear majority of ratepayers said no.

Now we have those who want a race-based advantage trying to negate democracy, by making it illegal for councils to use referendum.

Our governments have always avoided referendums because it’s awkward when citizens clearly express views about what they want.

Yet referendums are often used in other countries for the guidance of democratic governance.

The Waikato Regional Council imposed two Maori seats on the region without true consultation or opportunity to disagree.

The two representatives of the Maori race make decisions for all ratepayers, with a vested racial interest, at council meetings.

Why are we tolerating this apartheid?

Let the WRC justify its race-based presence by either a referendum or put it as an option in next year’s Long Term Plan – racism as opposed to democracy.
PETER H WOOD, Thames

NZ Herald 16/4/18 
REASONS FOR JAIL
An entire page of your Friday edition was devoted to our prison system, the financial costs, and the fact 30 per cent of prisoners are back inside within a year.

The article made no attempt to ask why so many are jailed and why so many are from one segment of society.

Surely the fact an overwhelming number have passed through (or even passed by) our education system without learning to read, write or calculate must be a factor?

Is it also likely that group comes from families that lack life skills and are welfare dependent and possibly have been for two or more generations.

I believe it is actually quite hard to get into prison, but once there it is hard to leave permanently.

Most new entrants are hardened criminals by the time they are incarcerated. For much of our prison population, red lights were flashing by the time they were born or even a generation or so earlier.

Maybe if we took a harder line much earlier the problem might solve itself. I am suggesting we lock up teens for a day or so before they face a judge. Taking them home to a mum who doesn't care is a waste of time.
MURRAY REID, Tuakau.

Dominion Post 16/4/18 
LIVING WITH RACISM
Racism has reared its ugly head again, mainly through the rants of Taika Waititi. This really comes as a surprise to me as Taika, as far as I thought, was one of the most successful and liked Kiwis in New Zealand.

Being Chinese I was both loved and hated by the whites here. I taught tai chi and martial arts for over 43 years to all races, including Maori, whom I found to be some of my best and most respectful students, as were all others. On the other hand for those who did not know I had martial arts knowledge I was a "Yellow bellied Chink" or a 'slit-eyed funny walking one", for a few anyway. Now in my 81st year I consider myself an example of being a belittled Chow who, in the end, belittled those insulting me, and without having to touch them, although I cautioned them what would happen to their bodies if they made a single aggressive move towards me.

Fear educates a racist to some degree because they are also mostly bullies and pick on you because of your size and insult you because of your race.

Racism is in every country on this planet. If it is not your race that people dislike you for it is the clan or area or country you were born in.

Racism at its worst is a reason for war. Hitler proved that, but I cannot agree with Taika that New Zealand is that bad. In fact, I think it is the best country in the world to live in.
STAN CHUN Newlands

Wanganui Chronicle 10/4/18 
FEEDING CROCS
Both local government and national government have been doing appeasement to all sorts of radical and other groups for some time now.

I don't think they have ever read Winston Churchill's quote, but their actions certainly appear to act out Winston's words: "An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last."

The coastal claims now going through the courts and government are a classic example, which — if the claimants have their way — will leave us so much poorer as a nation. The attempt locally to rename Queen's Park is another. While Bob Jones was a bit blunt with his suggestion of a "thank you day", if we don't work together for a better New Zealand for all — instead of fighting over ownership and the past — we will destroy this nation while the appeasers head overseas with their/our wealth.

Time to return to a New Zealand Day, which cannot be Waitangi Day because it is now a well-established part of the grievance industry.
TERRY O'CONNOR Wanganui

Nelson Mail 14/4/18 
CANCELLED TALK
Bruce Moon was scheduled to give a talk at the Nelson Library about what he feels the Treaty of Waitangi actually said.

The library, Nelson City Council, and Nelson Institute were all contacted by people saying he shouldn’t be allowed to talk on this topic. The council and the library considered these calls to be threats of violence, so they cancelled his talk.

For goodness sake, are we letting thugs dictate to us now? A public library, of all places, should be staunch in its defence of freedom of speech in a Democracy. They should have let Mr Moon proceed if he wished, and gotten a constable in to uphold the peace.
JOYCE ROBINSON, Wakefield

Bay of Plenty Times 14/4/18 
RACISM RIFE
Taika Waititi (News, April 10) is right, New Zealand is racist and it's getting worse. 
Article 3 of the Treaty granted equality of citizenship but we now have demands for separatist Maori wards and councillors voting for them without community support.

Iwi were funded $4 million to commemorate the NZ Wars. The descendants of the approximately 1000 British soldiers and militia killed were never involved or consulted.

We have about 600 claims by Maori for exclusive rights to every millimetre of New Zealand's coastline and seabed, with income potential and exclusion rights.

University academics now have to gain approval from a Maori committee to embark on a research project. The qualification to be on the committee is not having relevant scientific skills and knowledge but rather being of Maori heritage.

Recently we had the unedifying sight of tangata whenua trying to muscle Tauranga councillors to accept only the Cliff Rd site for the proposed museum and so deny community input into the decision making.

When one group of people demand special rights and privileges solely on the basis of race, and others push back against that sense of entitlement, you tell me, Mr Waititi, which group is being racist.
RICHARD PRINCE Welcome Bay

NZ Herald 14/4/18 
UNFAIR TO JEWELLER
It was sad to read of one of Auckland's oldest and most reputable jewellers being accused of racism over not allowing a customer to try on a high end diamond ring. 
Every jeweller in New Zealand will have robust customer security policies around their top end inventory and a $10.000 diamond ring would certainly fit into that category.

To turn what is sensible pragmatic business practice into a raoial profiling issue is a reflection on the customer rather than the retailer.
BRUCE ELIOTT, St Heliers.

NZ Herald 14/4/18 (‘A quick word’, section)
Would the shop assistant have been more likely to let the Maori lady try on the ring if Maori didn’t commit a disproportionate amount of crime?
J HOPKINS, Kohimarama.


Where Maori represent about 14 per cent of our population yet commit over 50 per cent of our crime (based on the prison muster), is it unreasonable for shopkeepers to pay more than average attention to them?
ADRIAN WILSON, Northcote.
The incident the Herald letters refer to here >http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12029952

Wanganui Chronicle 13/4/18 
DELUDED VIEW
Yet again (March 20) Potonga produces a deluded view of history with his claim that Bob Jones and Don Brash write racist propaganda when they state that Maori were saved from self-annihilation by the arrival of Europeans in colonial times.

Chief Taipari of the Bay of Plenty said exactly the same thing, while at the 1940 opening of the meeting house at Waitangi, statesman Sir Apirana Ngata said, "But for the sovereignty handed over to Her Majesty and her descendants, I doubt that there would be a free Maori race in New Zealand today".

More than 30,000 Maori were killed and eaten by other Maori in a few decades before 1840, about 1200 when the Waikato tribes captured the Te Ati Awa pa Pukerangiora in 1831, while more than 2000 met the same fate in 1821 when Ngapuhi captured Mauinaina pa.

There were fewer deaths in all the tribal rebellions of colonial times. Who were Potonga's real savages? The answer is obvious.
BRUCE MOON Nelson

Dominion Post 13/4/18 
OUR MONEY, OUR SAY
Josie Pagani complained that, although we give aid to Pacific Island nations, not only must we give more but do so with less involvement on how it is spent (It's not just about money, our Pacific mindset needs to change, April 10).

In my view, if it's our money we make the decisions.

Taika Waititi simultaneously complained that, although Europeans have built the best country in the world to live in, Maori still can't make a go of it because Europeans are racist.

Poor baby, I am disgruntled we give so much yet get only criticism in return. However, I do agree with Waititi that Europeans should stop patronising Maori and Pacific Islanders, especially with money.

It is an inherently unequal relationship that leads to claims of racism. To be equal, Maori and Pacific Islanders need to stand on their own two feet.

In New Zealand this means finalising land reparations and ceasing ongoing Maori benefits, such as the Maori seats.

For the Pacific Islands this entails we remember New Zealand is a sovereign nation and Jacinda Ardern is Prime Minister of New Zealand, not Mother of the Pacific.
BARRIE DAVIS Island Bay

NZ Herald 13/4/18 (Short & Sweet section) 
ON PETERS
Earth to Winston, are you out there? What has happened to the man that was going to set the country to rights? Winston seems to be missing in action. When is he going to start delivering on his election promises, e.g. removal of the race based Maori seats?
JOCK MaCVICAR, Hauraki.

The Press 12/4/18 
TARRED WITH ONE BRUSH
I can’t speak Maori and I don’t pretend that I can. I pronounce words the way I was brought up to pronounce them and that’s good enough for me. My stepfather is Maori and speaks Maori fluently. So does my half-sister. Some of my pakeha cousins speak Maori fluently; some of my Maori cousins don’t speak Maori at all. But we are an integrated family: Maori and pakeha together.

Am I a racist because I don’t pronounce all Maori words correctly? Of course not. I don’t hate my stepfather or my sister or my cousins. Are my Maori cousins Uncle Toms because they don’t speak their native language? The question doesn’t apply because their native language happens to be English. Many of them are like my sister: half Maori and half pakeha . This is my reality, but I’m no racist.

But Taika Waititi, who has never met me and knows nothing about my family, would say differently. Whether he is using Maori or English, on certain topics Mr Waititi really ought to think before he speaks and cease on his efforts to tar the whole of our largely tolerant nation with the same simple-minded brush.
JASON COLLINS, Strowan

NZ Herald 12/4/18 
RACISM CLAIM
I don’t know Taika Waititi. I’m Ngapuhi, I live overseas. I like his work.

I’d like to say to him, so because you’re famous now, you think you can throw a live chicken to the dogs without telling them it’s a seagull.

Who exactly is racist in New Zealand? Is it the New Zealand Vietnamese? The New Zealand Chinese? The New Zealand Irish? Or is it the Pakeha?

What is his target? And what does he want them to do about it? Go back to your talent. Or say something real.
BRENT SMITH, Ireland.

NZ Herald 12/4/18 (Short & Sweet section) 
ON RACISM
"Is there racism in New Zealand?" says headline. "Undeniably," says our Prime Minister and she is correct There is a plethora of separatist, race-based legislation sponsored, instigated and implemented by both local and central Government.
GRAHAM HANSEN, Howick

Northland Age 12/4/18 
LAST HURRAH
Mrs Devoy's 'last hurrah' spiel started off with "sharing peoples (Real NZ) stories of racial prejudice (leads to tolerance) and is at the heart of our anti-racism work," then morphs off into left field for NZ Relations Day, March 21, about Soweto, Sharpsville and Anne Frank.

Let's look at South Africa. Kiwis never supported apartheid and strongly protested against it. Certainly no Kiwis supported the Nazis' Jewish atrocities, which is one of the reasons why we went to war.

Clearly the Human Rights Commission Think tank', with its 50-plus staff, is back in the grove after the New Year break, conjuring up ways to justify their very existence.

Perhaps it is worth recalling that under ANC, South Africa has become a society that is breaking down. All ordinary citizens, apart from acquiring so-called `political freedom' (a mirage), are far worse off under the current regime than they ever were previously. There were better fed, better housed, better paid, better educated, had better health care and were safer.

Once Mandela had it gone it became a very sorry state of affairs.

Interestingly for Kiwis, the South African Parliament controlled by ANC has recently passed legislation to confiscate white farmers’ land, without compensation, and now seek to change the constitution. The president of this basket case economy says the time for peace and reconciliation is over, and stolen land will be reclaimed.

Hold on. Haven’t some of these farming families been there since the late 1600s, when the only black people originally there were the Kalihari bushmen (Khoisan) with the Bantu (Zulu, Xhosa and Tswana) black migrations south coming much later? The ANC people who promote/endorse murder and violence to achieve their ends are full of BS.

In my view, the ill-informed Race Relations Office, which prefers fiction over the facts and the truth, by its actions and preconceived mindsets creates racial tensions by actively supporting raced-based treatyist and separatist initiatives in this country. Frankly, it is about time we were rid of this lot.

Mrs Devoy was appointed Race Relations Commissioner on April 1, 2013 (aptly April Fool’s day) for a term of five years, expiring last week, thank heavens. No doubt however, some PC, leftist pointy head will try and extend that term.
ROB PATERSON, Matapihi


NEVER AOTEAROA
MP Chris Hipkins is wanting to spend $220,000 just to change the formerly New Zealand Teachers’ Council to the Teaching Council of Aotearoa.

Nu Tirani appears eight times in the Treaty of Waitangi as Maori never used the word Aotearoa. It was not a Maori name for New Zealand. In modern times Aotearoa has been used for New Zealand.

If George Gray used it once or twice it is of no significance. Going back in time, when it was never used like around 1120AD, when a banished people from Scotland arrived, this was called Far Land.

Abel Tasman (1642) named it Staten Landt, amongst other names. Te Ira o Maui, Aotea, Whai Repo and Orokeroke were names for the North Island, with Te Wai Pournanamu, Te Waka a Aoraki and Kaikalda for the South Island, Nukuroa was also used.

Aotearoa was the name of the South Island in the middle century. Maori began to favour, Nu Tirani which is what is called in the treaty and in official documents in Maori.

In 1325 Kupe’s wife said E Kupe he Aotea.

To use the word Aotearoa in the name of our country is another falsity. It does not appear in the Treaty and was never used at the time. According to the Waitaha and Moriori people New Zealand was only called Aotea, not Aotearoa.

Aotearoa is inconsistent and must be unacceptable. It betrays the history and origins of New Zealand and should be rigorously eliminated. Our country has been New Zealand for about 370 years.
IAN BROUGHAM, Wanganui

Dominion Post 12/4/18 
RACISM REACTION: WAITITI'S ‘RIGHT'
Taika Waititi has said New Zealand is "racist as t..." (Waititi: NZ the best but "it is racist". April 10) and he's right.

Racism is engendered through our post-European history. Successive governments since the Treaty of Waitangi (composed by rare Englishmen who attempted to create a fair deal with Maori) have taken advantage of Maori lack of understanding of Western values, especially from the time when rapid immigration placed Maori in a minority, when the Treaty was ignored and Maori didn't have a vote. except by way of rebellion.

Attempts to appease Maori complaints of unfairness resulted in patronising legislation, such as the Maori electorates and electoral roll which has helped to sustain racism in both directions.

However, the perceived "handouts" to Maori since the end of World War II have hardened the attitudes of some Pakeha.

Since Maori have now attained some of the highest positions in leadership in the country, surely it is time to dismantle the Maori electorates and roll, in favour of kotahitanga (one people), so we can all at last become proud New Zealanders. I wonder what Taika Waititi thinks of this suggestion.
RAY RICHARDS, Trentham


SCIENCE COLOUR BLIND
When Dame Anne Salmond accuses Bob Brockie of ethnocentricity in his defence of 'pakeha science' she is making a grave mistake (Science of nature without culture, Dominion Post, April 6). There is no such thing as Pakeha science, nor American science, German science, English science or Chinese science.

Science does not belong to any nation, race or religious group, it is universal.

Maori are just as capable as anyone else of studying science and doing cutting-edge science, and by claiming that science is the preserve of Pakeha, Dame Salmond is denying them that opportunity.

Once, Europeans believed that the body had four humours in balance; blood, phlegm, black bile and yellow bile. For centuries they believed that disease was caused by imbalance of these humours and they would treat almost every disease by bleeding patients. Medicine could not advance until the notion of humours was disproved.

Traditional beliefs can be comforting, sometimes they lead to real medical and scientific advances, but sometimes they are wrong and need to be set aside. Otherwise they become shackles.

Science must be free to question any and all beliefs, regardless of political correctness, so that all people are free to enjoy the benefits.
JONATHAN DEPREE Palmerston North

NZ Herald 11/4/18
ON RACIST
We must all be racist if mispronunciation of place names is the new guideline. Stop being so precious, Mr Waititi.
JOCK MacVICAR, Hauraki.

Northland Age 10/4/18 
WHO’S RACIST?
Reading letters to the editor on Thursday, April 5, I became interested in the one about Denise being treated unfairly at Waikato Hospital (Racism is alive and well). 
All was going well in my understanding until I reached the middle. Wow, I am bloody disgusted too Hone, in you! What’s up with this “Maori woman” business? Kicking Denise out of the ward was ignorant but was not racist. It obviously is the rule of the ward/hospital, which carries no bias in skin colour.

As I write this, my mother is so close to taking her last breath that she is probably unaware that she is still breathing, also due to cancer, but family members are disallowed to remain by her side over night.

She is not a Maori woman, so what can I call this bad treatment?

Now why is it that you think Denise should be treated any different to anyone else? Does she personally think she has a right to violate rules because she has a different-colour skin to others who are given the same ruling?

Denise surely phoned you for comfort and help but you have sadly started your rant and pulled out your usual racism card. There is no need for that, but it confirms that racism is alive and well in your mind still, even after the long length of time I haven’t heard much about/from you.

You rightly say in the letter, “Every person who is in deep pain and suffering has the right to have somebody at their side in the hours leading up to critical surgery”, then off you go again on your diatribe.

You have my pity in that you feel everyone else in New Zealand is superior to part-Maori people.

Broadcasting your woeful belief of racial discrimination is bringing discontent to those whom you think you are standing up for. Can’t you see that? Why don’t you try being a caring and thoughtful man Hone, and join in the life of the living, the here and now?

Toss your anger and insecurities in the sewerage pond where it belongs.
KAREN, RD2 Kaitaia

Dominion Post 9/4/18 
IN BAT FOR BROCKIE
Dame Anne Salmond (Science of nature without culture, April 6) thunders in on her high horse, hackles and lance of scorn raised and, completely misses her target.

The grand dame is so intent on skewering Bob Brockie that she misses the main thrust of his argument (March 26), which is, why should Maori tribes be asked for permission before scientific research projects can proceed?

It is an outrageous proposition and Anne Salmond would surely feel aggrieved if the suggestion was made that she seek permission from people ignorant of history before she began her studies.

Predictably, from her Maori-centric position, Salmond attacks Brockie on grounds of cultural disrespect yet fails to comprehend that she is showing similar disrespect to science by misrepresenting scientists.

Her fellowship of the Royal Society of NZ does not absolve her of balanced argument and common sense.
ALLEN HEATH Woburn

NZ Herald 9/4/18 
COSTLY CORRECTNESS
So now we have the Rotorua Mayor, Shane Jones and a few other misguided souls wanting to rewrite towns' welcome signs in Maori.

They won't be paying for this, it will be footed by the ratepayer, taxpayer or both.

Signs that fewer than 5 per cent of us can read. More political correctness and lunacy.
ROD KANE, Henderson.

Nelson Mail 9/4/18 
TREATY PROMISES AND FREE SPEECH
Trust Gary Clover to stick his oar in again (Mailbox, April 6).

Quoting directly Article second of Hobson's final draft of February 4, 1840, the treaty actually "guarantee[d] to the chiefS and tribes and to all the people of New Zealand the possession of their lands, dwellings and property" and that is all, whatever the learned persons he names may have said.

His claim of "a joint sharing of government in a Tonga-like protectorate" is a figment of his imagination.

I was actually due to explain all this yesterday in a talk in the Nelson library to the Nelson Institute.

The Nelson City Council, the library and the institute were all contacted by persons saying that I should not be allowed to talk on this topic in the library.

The council and library considered that the threat of violence by persons opposed to me was sufficiently real that my talk was cancelled.

Nelson citizens may form their own views on this kind of intimidation and the denial of my right to free speech.
BRUCE MOON Nelson,

Northern Advocate 9/4/18 
BICULTURALISM
S Leitch’s letter ( Advocate March 26) regarding tribal settlement payouts and foreshore/seabed claims is another wake-up call for all New Zealanders.

The Maori renaissance movement has gained significant power in New Zealand for two main reasons.

Firstly they persuaded the Government to adopt biculturalism as a defining feature of New Zealand life and then positioned their influential supporters in the public service, academia, religious establishments and other powerful institutions.

And secondly, they have persuaded successive governments to generously settle their never-ending claims for public resources under the guise of historic and modern-day breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi.

This policy of appeasement has resulted in billions of dollars and significant power being transferred to the elite iwi hierarchy.

With dedicated Maori seats in Parliament, an education system and news media that pushes questionable propaganda with no opposition, this movement is slowly but surely pushing our country to an apartheid state.
G PARKER Kamo

Wanganui Chronicle 9/4/18 
NZ HISTORY 
Potonga Neilson (Chronicle, March 20) sees history a little different to my education.

Europeans brought disease and evolutionary arrogance to New Zealanders, but they did suppress cannibalism and generally utu. Was this an improvement?

Now quite a few people here support the killing of the unborn child, including Maori.

He writes: "Our Maori ancestors were 'one with the universe', a concept recently rediscovered by modern philosophers." Such an idea has been around since recorded history — it is part of English rites, North and South America, Scandinavia religion, all pre-Christian. But it is only part of the truth — animism is the subjective part of creation where a creator needs to be a part of what is made from nothing.

One thought: Utopia on Earth is not possible if history is any witness, there always being someone who thinks they know better, someone who has a grudge or an injustice. Another mystery to solve.
F R HALPIN Gonville 
  
The Press 7/4/18 
TROTTER REBUTTAL
Once again Chris Trotter evokes the myth of the ‘‘noble savage’’ (The Press, Mar 3). Prior to external contact, stone-age tribes in New Zealand had no social cohesion as Maori. The 100 or so tribes often attacked each other. Total population is estimated at 100,000 spread over the country. Once they got their hands on muskets, the inter-tribal attacks became even more murderous. These were not ‘‘noble’’ savages.

Virtually all racism in New Zealand today arises out of Maori demanding, and sadly, too often getting special treatment and extra-democratic powers. The justification for these demands being the Treaty. Who could seriously consider that the most powerful empire on Earth at the time would seek an equal ‘‘partnership’’ with a bunch of primitive tribes?
LAURIE TUFF, Prebbleton


HEALING HISTORTY'S HURTS
Ho hum. In response to Gluckman, Chris Trotter wheels out the old racist colonisation evil whitey mantra.

So easy to look back and point. There is more to it.

Start with Cook introducing pigs and potatoes, Maori (skilled gardeners) spread them in months, thus getting a better food supply and a population explosion followed.

Then followed the vicious musket wars. Massacres of the South Island and Chatham Island followed. These awful events left a lasting legacy? We need to remember them. (Lets not mention alcohol, smallpox, flu, etc.)

The chiefs could have called on the French, Spanish or Dutch for an alliance. No, they were intelligent men- with all their warts the Brits were the best bet.


Ever hear of the Highland clearances? The Scots did it to themselves too. History hurts. The question is what to do today.
RICHARD R BRUCE Ashburton

Wanganui Chronicle 7/4/18 
WAITAHA PEOPLE
Pukenamu/Queens Park "Council push to rename reserve" (Chronicle, March 16):

To Maori, Pukenamu was a pa in the 1830s and the site of the last tribal war in Wanganui.

What was supposed to be a fortified pa would have been a well.established village centuries before that, probably built by the Waitaha people who lived in the area and built the other pa further up the river.

The translation of pounamu could mean "Sandfly Hill", though sometimes namu is a shortened version of pounamu, the precious greenstone jade.

Councillor Helen Craig said it was important to acknowledge the reserve’s Maori history, yet it doesn't seen important to acknowledge the existence of the Waitaha people.
IAN BROUGHAM Tawhero

NZ Herald 6/4/18 (Short & Sweet section) 
On cross Like David Hay I am very disappointed the Tupuna Maunga Authority has removed the cross from Mt Roskill. 

I feel we are being rode roughshod over in the name of Maori spirituality.
FIONA WALTON, Mt Roskill.

Northland Age 5/4/18 
TOMFOOLERY
The front page of your March 29 edition tells us that “A kaumatua performed a karakia to bless the [repaired road]”. Why ? Perhaps to keep away taniwha.

And, perhaps even more relevantly, why was this considered important enough to report?

In a political environment which is working diligently to remove Christian principles, rituals and references from our community, why is the tomfoolery of animism given special elevation? Well, we know why — because it appeases the part-Maori. And I expect that this kaumatua enjoys a nice income from performing these farces.

Christians and their principles and values produced Western civilisation, with its freedoms and its justice and its tolerance — matchless civilisation. As Sir Robert Jones wrote recently, partMaori should have an annual day of thanksgiving to the European settlers.

Churchill wrote: “An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last.”

Let’s just put this animism rubbish in the garbage can, and move on with sanity and rationality.
LEO LEITCH Benneydale

Northern Advocate 5/4/18 
END ‘THEM & US’
I find Kelvin Davis’ opinion column in Monday’s Advocate encouraging and will attend the local hui in Whangarei.

He writes “there’s got to be a better way forward for the Crown and Maori and we need to start talking about our future now.

“Maori and the Crown need to start thinking about what a Crown/Maori relationship looks like (in the future).”

The implication of using the term “Crown” is that the other 85 per cent of New Zealanders are not part of the discussions. The conversations need to be organised by Crown representatives, but encouraging Maori and all other New Zealanders to participate.

When the foreshore and seabed controversy was before us, there were hui organised throughout New Zealand of which only Maori were notified and participated in. The implication being that the rest of us had no interest or association with the subject. I hope Kelvin Davis will include us all in deciding the way forward for good nationwide co-operation and the end to “them and us”.
ROBIN LIEFFERING, Onerahi

Dominion Post 4/4/18 (Also in Southland Times 4/4/18) 
DESPAIR FOR SCIENCE
Richard Bedford, president of the Royal Society, is deluded (Letters, March 31) if he thinks that there are any "researchers' responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi", a simple document which said in essence only that the chiefs ceded sovereignty completely and for ever to the Queen and all Maori (including their many slaves) received the rights of the people of England.

Again, he refers to "Aotearoa New Zealand". He should try looking for "Aotearoa" in Te Tiriti. His ignorance of that document is profound. I despair for science under his leadership.
BRUCE MOON Fellow of the Institute of Physics, UK Nelson

Wanganui Chronicle 4/4/18 
MAORI VOTES
The Maori Party has elected a new president, Che Wilson. If he desires the success of his party, he has to work for the demise of the Maori seats because Maori who want to vote for Maori in those seats are effectively voting Labour.

With a strong Maori representation in the main parties, their use-by date has arrived.

The removal of these seats would mean that Maori who vote on the Maori roll would vote Maori Party, and under an MMP parliamentary system that is where the Maori votes should be.
G R SCOWN Wanganui

The Press 3/4/18 
DOUBLE INEQUALITY
With yet another report claiming Maori inequality, this time from Berl, does this mean that it will be many generations before this issue begins to be satisfactorily resolved?

With the recent top-up settlements to Ngai Tahu and Waikato Tainui, and more to come, why is it taking so long for those inequality statistics to improve? In some cases Maori are using that money prudently and taking advantage of tax-exempt activities and other fiscal benefits by running their businesses as charities, and from time to time stories are told of the success of individual Maori. But what of the greater numbers of Maori who do not appear to be benefiting from these settlements?

Maori authorities have a low income tax rate, which is overdue for a review, and are at least contributing to the greater good, but that is not the case with many Maori-based charities, thereby creating yet another inequality by eroding the tax base through which all New Zealanders benefit.
DR MICHAEL GOUSMETT Rangiora

Dominion Post 3/4/18 
MISGUIDED THINKING
Bob Brockie's column (March 26) about the encroachment of the Treaty of Waitangi into scientific research was an uncomfortable wake-up call to the ongoing pervasiveness of misguided politically correct thinking throughout our society.

The reply from Nicola Gaston (Letters, March 28) was further proof of how effective this propaganda can be.

She attacks Brockie for his lack of morality and his scientific incompetence around the issue of Maori consultation on scientific research. I think Brockie's main "crime" here is to be white and of a more mature age group, a demographic which seems to be coming under increasing attack from certain quarters at present.

Gaston's main beef is about the male-dominated culture in science and the supposed lack of opportunities for women with appropriate qualifications. Fair enough. But how she conflates this idea with trained scientists having to consult iwi representatives with no formal training or knowledge in specific scientific research areas is beyond me.

Perhaps we should now revisit some of the more notable scientific achievements of the last few centuries and maybe discard some of the theories due to the flawed and biased way of thinking from its mainly white, male proponents. The likes of Darwin, Einstein, Pasteur, Rutherford and Newton may have been wrong all along.
CHRIS HALL Palmerston North

Southland Times 3/4/18 
DON'T CALL ME PAKEHA
Sorry Peter Hosking (Call me Pakeha, March 31) but I was probably one of those individuals who crossed out Pakeha on the previous census forms.

You wish to be PC about this?

Let's be totally PC and leave the choice as NZ European.

The name Pakeha was given to us as settlers and, beyond these shores, means nothing.

If you choose to be labelled a Pakeha instead of NZ European you are indeed a sad puppy.

If you travel abroad a lot and describe yourself as a Pakeha you may gather some strange reactions.
RAY WILSON Invercargill

Daily Post Rotorua 2/4/18 
MAORI SIGNS AT LIBRARY ‘ABSURD’
In response to a letter from Mr John Pakes, (Letters, March 31), regarding signs in the library, I would like to point out that whatever the Rotorua Lakes Council may decide in their wisdom or otherwise, English is still the number one language in New Zealand.

Accordingly, seeing signs in Maori at the top is strange to put it very politely.

Secondly, if there were any Maoris (sic) so uneducated that they do not speak English, I have no doubt that they would not be able to read either.

In other words, having signs in Maori as well as in English, in the library or anywhere else, is just absurd.
HARRY BRASSER, Rotorua

Nelson Mail 2/4/18 
TREATY RESEARCH
Richard Bedford, President of the Royal Society, is deluded (31/3/18) if he thinks that there are any ‘‘researchers’’ responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi’’, a simple document which said in essence only that the chiefs ceded sovereignty completely and for ever to the Queen and all Maoris (including their many slaves) received the rights of the people of England. Again, he refers to ‘‘Aotearoa New Zealand’’.

He should try looking for ‘‘Aotearoa’’ in Te Tiriti. His ignorance of that document is profound. I despair for science under his leadership.
BRUCE MOON, Nelson

Hawkes Bay Today 2/4/18 
TRACK BENEFITS
Thank you Michael Bate for informing the wider community about the plans that Craggy Range had for their track, which could and should become a real tourist attraction here in Hawke's Bay.

It is a real pity that a minority decided to interfere and attempt to prevent the partially completed track, which has cost $300,000 to date.

This track is currently supported by some 17,500 people who see the benefit of it and want to see it stay.

We now appear to have the Environmental Defence Society threatening to take it all the way to the High Court. From my knowledge we have heard nothing whatsoever from this group about recent issues such as toxic algae in the Tuki Tuki River, or pollution in the Pandora pond in Napier. The use of land and the disposal of plastic, coastline erosion, fishing nets in which endangered species become entangled, oil and gas drilling ... these are just some of the examples these people should be concentrating on. Obviously this is an organisation that has yet to identify its priorities, and not pick on easy targets such as private enterprises.

Our local iwi have called the Craggy Range track a scar on our landscape. I would respectfully suggest they concentrate on supporting the good guy in Flaxmere, Henare O'Keefe, in his endeavours to support the community there. Why have Ngati Kahungunu not put the same amount of vocal energy into the Flaxmere crisis instead of continuing to procrastinate about those good people who paid for this expensive tourist attraction at Craggy Range?

I would respectfully suggest that these two organisations get their "own houses in order" before attacking others.
LOU G KLINKHAMER Havelock North

Wanganui Chronicle 2/4/18 
MAKE IT KIWI
Call me what you like, but make it Kiwi! Rob Rattenbury (Chronicle, Letters March 7) has evoked a similar view to my own, as have others to whom I have spoken.

Identified as Maori because of the colour of my skin, I would Jokingly blame it on "pirates"?

To the Census question, I write New Zealander under "Other" not NZ European/Pakeha.

Recent ancestral research has found no "Pakeha", a term I see as demeaning and erroneous.

To my amazement, it shows not only do my bloodlines stretch to English, Irish and French but also Prince Philip's father, the King of Greece, Princess Olga Romanov, and Alexandra, wife of Nicholas I of Russia. That does not make me "royal". I kneel only to the New Zealand flag.

There should be no ethnic nor skin colour assignation to describe who I am. And if we are really all born equal here, it is time to delete this racism — or does it really mean entitlement to special privilege?
KEN CRAFAR Durie Hill